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Author Topic: A. fasciata pupurea  (Read 941 times)
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Robin
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« on: June 14, 2011, 13:05:09 »

Hi All

I have a few plants of fasciata var purpurea in my collection - always loved the idea ( Huh) of a fasciata with purple foliage!  And that's where the problem started.  I acquired a few plants - with hideously long foliage - typical Aechmea-look but not the lovely compact urn of typical fasciata. 

I am loathe to chop the leaves short and move them to high light intensity where the typical fasciata thrives (almost like a xerophyte) - my understanding of the purple colouration on the underside of the leave to trap as much usable light as possible (not let it through the leaf) and is typical of low-light plants such as those of the forest floor.  Putting them in high light intensity would surely "cook" them?

Anybody else have a similar problem with fasciata purpurea?  My plants are grown in pine bark chunks with some fern fibre to fill the gaps.  No fertilliser. Only the odd small leaf that falls into the cup.

I would appreciate any suggetsions - provided you've tried them - me no want to be experimenting!

Cheers

Robin
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splinter1804
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« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2011, 23:07:05 »

Hi everyone,

Robin - I only have one Ae. fasciata pupurea and find it much slower growing than my other Ae. fasciatas. I got it from a chap who pulled a pup from a large plant he had mounted on a tree in his garden a couple of years ago. I just grow it in a pot beneath 50% shade cloth with a few other Ae. fasciatas and Ae. orlandianas. The side facing North is open and and gets full winter sun (when we have any)

I have another Ae. fasciata which I got from another friend and I like it better than the pupurea. It is lighter in colour, is a faster grower but I don't know if the name is correct, it was just called Ae. fasciata rubra, perhaps someone knows the correct name.

Ae. fasciata pupurea

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Ae. fasciata rubra

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Ae. fasciata rubra

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All the best, Nev.


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Brod
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Aechmea lilacinantha


« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2011, 00:18:01 »

Hi Robin,

I am growing a few of these. Some on trees others in the ground. For me these seem to take more sun that the standard faciata. Some of my ones are in full sun. One of the original plants came from a clump that was growing in all day full sun and looked great. I have some old mothers in pots to force more pups and these are in more shade and tend to loose the red colouring. Our climate in Sth. Queensland would be similar to Durban. I'm not sure where you are. So my conclusion is high light is better for va purpurea.

Nev, love what you are calling Ae. fasciata rubra. Great colouring.

Brod
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paul_t23
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« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2011, 00:36:48 »

Hi all,

Nev, those purple fasciatas of yours are still looking good!

Robin, I have a couple of different purple ones and I haven't tried them out in a couple of spots where I've had some ordinary fasciatas that get some scorching full sun and end up being a bit over-cooked but not destroyed, so I'm not sure about the extreme upper limits.  However, I have tried them in few places that aren't quite so harsh and they seem fine.  

The best results in terms of colour and form have been where they get good bright diffused light for as much of the day as possible - around 50% shade, growing together with Neos like Jewellery Shop, Garnish, Hot Gossip etc and Bills like Hallelujah, that have grown well, kept nice compact form and coloured up beautifully.  So, if you have spots like that, I'd give the purple fasciata a try in them.

One thing that I have found with them is that they hate being cold in low light.  Cold in bright diffused light seems to be fine, but if they are too shaded and cold, then I can expect leaves to die back very quickly.  This leads me to suspect that in this case, those beaut purple anthocyanin pigments are probably there as a sunscreen to protect them in high light, rather than to assist them in low light.  

Hmm, having just had that thought occur to me,  I'm going to stick a pup in full morning sun for the rest of the winter and see what it does.  I'll let you know how it goes!

Cheers, Paul    
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« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2011, 00:39:24 »

Hi Brod,

Looks like we were typing at the same time.  That is really interesting to see your comments about high light.  Now I'm definitely going to put that pup out in full morning sun!

Cheers, Paul
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Aechmea lilacinantha


« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2011, 04:21:03 »

Here is one in a good deal of sun beginning to flower. Photo was take early morning so a bit of shade is on it.

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This photo is of an old mother with a pup growing. This was in full shade so the underleaf colour is green. I've moved it to all day full sun which this time of year should not be a problem. Once it's a bit bigger I'll remove the pup and attach it to a tree in full sun. Notice how long the leaves are on the pup because of the shade.

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I'm with you Paul on the washed out look of normal fasciatas in too much sun. This is a photo of one growing on a tree in full sun. It's growing strong enough but is very washed out and anaemic looking. The Ae. 'Flamingo' next to it looks much better.


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Cheers
Brod
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Robin
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« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2011, 08:22:58 »

Fantastic! Thanks Nev, Brod and Paul - firstly your plants are spectacular, secondly this was just the advice I was hoping to get!

My plants at the mo look like Brod's second pic - you can understand my dismay when they should be looking like especially Nev's first pic!  Well its time for some tough love!

Cheers

Robin

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« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2012, 12:05:24 »


I'm with you Paul on the washed out look of normal fasciatas in too much sun. This is a photo of one growing on a tree in full sun. It's growing strong enough but is very washed out and anaemic looking. The Ae. 'Flamingo' next to it looks much better.


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Cheers
Brod


Hey Brod, I grabbed A.flamingo today at the Sunny Coast meeting, wondering whether this should go in full sun all year round or not. Man you have to come visit, give me some "in garden" brom tips  Cheesy
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Brod
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Aechmea lilacinantha


« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2012, 13:47:48 »

I have a few in all day sun and they do fine. Probably see you Tuesday night, I hear you are the speaker.
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Wal
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« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2012, 00:16:36 »

I have a few in all day sun and they do fine. Probably see you Tuesday night, I hear you are the speaker.

Thanks Brod, me speaker ? that's a vicious rumour that I started... Grin

Yes I will be rambling on..... Cheesy

And, you will see photos of most of my broms in action, um, in the garden..
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