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Author Topic: Hoh. castellanosii seasonal change  (Read 4052 times)
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Lisa
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« Reply #30 on: March 07, 2011, 03:55:06 »

Ah, okay....... now that you mention it, I do recall seeing something like that on Tropiflora's site.  I was hoping for really bright variegation, but I would like to see a picture of yours, Pedro. 
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« Reply #31 on: March 07, 2011, 08:16:41 »

Here it is Lisa, recovering after the usual torrid travel and quarantine experience. I think it will look OK as a mature plant though white stripes would be better. I don't know of any other variegated Hohenbergias though.
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There is an interesting selection of Hoh's at Tropiflora. Most of them are hard to put an accurate name on though.

Tomorrow, if it's not raining, I'm going to bust up some concrete and make a special mix for my remaining castellanosiis and maybe an ampla too. I might try some of the bulbous ones in it too. One thing is for sure, the pots won't fall over!

And now for someHohing completely different. Got this plant from a BG in Europe - interesting! There are a lot of species in this genus and not that many are being cultivated widely. Many are still undescribed too. They really suit tropical and sub-tropical gardens well. Hoh distans was named well over 100 yrs ago and has only been collected once since according to the description. It probably grew in the lowland rainforests of Jamaica, now mostly all gone. I hope it sets seed.

Hoh. distans
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Cheers, Pedro
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« Reply #32 on: March 07, 2011, 08:45:44 »

Nice Mitch, I knew you wouldn't let the side down.

Pedro, I like the variegated one too and the distans. Do you know why distans isn't listed on FCBS, but appears in various google searches ?...has it been reclassified recently ?

Cheers, Graeme
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« Reply #33 on: March 07, 2011, 09:31:08 »

Good luck with your new variegated one Pedro. I wonder if those lighter green lines would show through any red? Could be nice...

Welcome from me, Mitche. Good job on your Hohs in Auckland!

Graeme - Ho. distans is listed in the FCBS species data base, just not represented in the FCBS photo index. The only reason for that, I assume, is because no-one has submitted any photos - yet. Pedro?

There are several missing photo submissions of Hohenbergia species. I have just sent photos of my flowering Hohenbergia inermis to Michael Andreas - webmaster of FCBS - because it has yet to be represented in the photo index.

I do like that pretty pendulous inflo of Ho. distans, Pete. I bought two from Tropiflora last year, but alas, they both succumbed to the gassing.  Cry

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« Reply #34 on: March 07, 2011, 09:38:37 »

Hi Graeme, it's listed in the latest binomials. UD doesn't have a pic of it either so maybe only in Europe?? (until now) It survived winter under plastic without heat which is a plus!  Castellanosii is a bit cold tender too but I can grow it successfully outside over winter, usually. Do you leave it outside, Mitche?

Kerry, your message just came through. I didn't see distans at Tropiflora but I was on tight schedule and spent most of my time with the Tills! I sent some pics to UD who'll forward them on. They'll be on the Aussie site too soon.

Cheers, Pedro
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« Reply #35 on: March 07, 2011, 09:40:35 »

Hi everyone,

Congrats to BA and Japie on getting a bit of red on your plants!  I'm another one in the race too, having been inspired to obsessive determination by that famous GW post way back, and you are both beating me!  I'll just have to try a few more things.

Re the role of some sort of marine-ish influence, with Lisa invoking the (dammit, I can't work out how to go back a page and grab that ET reference) planet ??, I'm going to report on my bit of fiddling.  I started following that GW discussion in the hope of getting a step ahead.  Oh well, not quite, but anyway.  I pulled my castellanossii out of its normal bark mix and put it into a mix of half medium pinebark (no fines, a bit acid), half scoria (neutral pH), and a big dose of powdered dolomite.  That was last autumn, almost a year ago, and here it is yesterday.  It's only about 40cm high and was a lot more yellow before the last week of mainly overcast weather, but:

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Those black leaf tips are from the summer before the mix change - uniformly horrible, while the leaves in the middle with no black tips - uniformly not too bad - are all from the summer that we've just been through, including a lot of hot stuff.  It's only a single result so maybe it's an accident, but maybe it isn't.  If that's the case, then maybe there are a couple of things going on with this red-tips business.   Maybe the alkaline pH / levels of calcium / magnesium / whatever are acting to make the leaf tips more robust in what are less than ideal conditions, and this increased rubustness then allows them (since they are not dead) to get a bit of red if the conditions of light intensity/temperature/humidity whatever are conducive for a while?   

Whadyareckon?  That could explain why the marine-ish bit doesn't really matter to Lisa's plants, if they are so desperately happy that their nutrient uptake mechanisms are working well enough to scavenge whatever they need without any help.

NB The cumulative build-up of light intensity and temperature might just not be enough here to get my castellanosii red, but I haven't given up yet!  As soon as the pup on my plant gets big enough to come off, I'm going to plant it in shellgrit and spray it with dilute seaweed extract and sea water.  See what that does to it!

Cheers, Paul

PS Pedro, I really hope you get some red on that variegated plant.  Can't wait to see what it looks like.


   
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« Reply #36 on: March 07, 2011, 20:28:22 »

Hi all,
From my understanding  broms take nutrients thru their roots when they are young and when more mature they use the roots to hang onto what they are attached too.  The nutrients are then taken thru whatever is flying around (dirt, dust etc) and lands in the well.  It's the seasonal vote for me.
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« Reply #37 on: March 07, 2011, 21:31:49 »

Hi Dooley,

From my understanding  broms take nutrients thru their roots when they are young and when more mature they use the roots to hang onto what they are attached too.  The nutrients are then taken thru whatever is flying around (dirt, dust etc) and lands in the well.  It's the seasonal vote for me.
Dooley.

Good point, and that certainly seems to be the consensus for epiphytic broms and epiphytes seem to be the subject of most of the research, which is not surprising since they involve such a neat and interesting set of adaptations.  In a rough-and-ready search (google), I haven't come across anything that deals specifically with nutrient uptake in terrestrial broms like Hoh. castellanosii, apart from vague, unsubstantiated statements that they probably take up nutrients through their roots like normal terrestrial plants, and I suspect that this would make it pretty boring from a research point of view.   So, I can't point to anything definitive, but for a group of plants that makes its living from being able to survive where most other things can't, I reckon it would be pretty remarkable if they weren't very good at making use of whatever is around them, including in the soil if that is where they normally grow and they happen to be growing in it. 

All that aside, your point may well be correct for these plants, but hey, I'm still going to have some fun playing around with what is in the growing medium.  You never know!

Cheers, Paul
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« Reply #38 on: March 08, 2011, 03:29:09 »

I don't have much faith in the salt formula. I got this specimen from Terri Bert and it was very green at that time and I put it not more than 25 feet from salt water in major sun and by November this is all the red that I got. It certainly didn't get drenched with salt water, but I'm sure it got a regular misting whenever the wind was from the east, which would be most days. Most of my plants get a good dose of salt and I don't think they care much as long as they get watered twice a week with fresh water.

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« Reply #39 on: March 08, 2011, 05:15:29 »

Photoshop. That's my best explanation right now! Hahaha. My plant is in very sandy soil but the PH is on the acidic side. Going to dose my plant with some lime and a bit of Italian sausage!   
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« Reply #40 on: March 08, 2011, 07:12:56 »

Well i'm going to attach mine to a tree with full sun an starve it.  That will be my experiment!!
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« Reply #41 on: March 08, 2011, 21:21:53 »

Hey Dennis, I like that idea of the Italian sausage - drop it in the middle? or just wave it past, like some sort of organic crystal?

Nick, there seems to be something weird going on with these plants.  You don't get much red on yours, but are you in a very different climate to Michael's, where a few people have mentioned his plants get nice and red?  And Dooley, go for it!  But, you're up in Cairns, which is about 10 degrees closer to the equator than Nick and Michael's, and a bit closer than Lisa as well in some serious cooking country, so do you really have to pull the poor fella out of the ground too?  Interested in more thoughts!

Cheers, Paul 

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« Reply #42 on: March 08, 2011, 23:30:45 »

Hi Dooley, it will interesting to see how it goes growing as an epiphyte when it is a terrestrial in nature. You are in the same latitude as southern Bahia. What do the plants look like in your area. I guess you receive more rainfall than southern Bahia so this may effect the colouring. Does your father or others you know in the Townsville area with its dryer conditions grow Cn. If so does it colour up like Lisa's.

A couple of images I found of Cn. in the wild

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Cheers
Brod
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« Reply #43 on: March 09, 2011, 01:12:12 »

Photoshop. That's my best explanation right now!   

Shhhhh......... I almost had them believing it!   Wink

Actually, what I've done is taken several Neo. johannis and bound their leaves together at the base so they grow upright.  It even fooled Kerry when she saw them!   Roll Eyes

Thanks for the habitat photos, Brod.  I know this species is generally found growing in the dunes, but does that make it a true terrestrial?  I don't think of Hohenbergias as being terrestrial in the same way as, say, Dyckias or Orthophytums.  Some species do grow epiphytically.  I guess you'll just have to try it and find out, Dooley.  It seems capable of growing with no media in a cement block, so that's pretty close. 
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« Reply #44 on: March 09, 2011, 02:44:20 »

Great habitat pics, Brod! Love to see them in situ, one day...

Love to have johannis like them, Lisa. Sparse spines, narrow sheaths, white indument. Great form!

Experiment - I repotted half of mine in a 'bag of cement' (solidified cement, weathered in the garden, roughly crushed and some well dolomited regular mix added + slow release fert.). Put an ampla in it too. Castellanosii has a big root system so I'll be feeding it up not starving it on a tree intil I get a few more pups to play with, but I'll be interested to hear how the epiphytic method goes, Dooley.

Cheers, Pedro
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