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Author Topic: Ursulaea info  (Read 1256 times)
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sdandy
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« on: January 21, 2011, 18:44:24 »

Hey guys, would anyone happen to have decent close up pictures of either of the Ursulaea species 1) flowers, 2) seed pods (with and without fluff), 3) leaf undersides, and 4) spines of macvaughii?  Any pictures of those would be greatly appreciated.  From my memory I recall seeing a U. tuitensis with berries that were ridged/knobby like a large Billbergia (helicoid group) berry, does anyone know for sure?  Are U. macvaughii ridged or smooth?  Also does anyone know the natural habit of macvaughii -- whether it is epiphytic, lithophytic, etc?
« Last Edit: January 22, 2011, 02:01:39 by sdandy » Logged

splinter1804
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« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2011, 20:37:57 »

Hi Andy,

The only pic's I've seen of flowers were on the FCBS site so I can't be of much more help to you.

All I know is I grew some from seed and the germination rate was phenomenal, but when they got to about 2" high they just stopped growing and I also suspect they don't like the cooler weather here on the south coast of NSW in the colder months. If anyone has any cultural advice I'd be most grateful to hear it.

I've now farmed most of them out to friends around the state to see if they can do any better as I feel they don't have a future here in my collection.

I'll be anxiously awaiting any info that is forth coming.

All the best, Nev.
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Lisa
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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2011, 20:58:10 »

Can't help you with U. macvaughii, Andy, although I'll bet you could find some more photos on the GW.

I have bloomed U. tuitensis, and I don't recall the fruits being ridged, or in any way different from your average Aechmea (fat, dark purple berry). It's been a while, though.  The only photo I have is pre-digital, and it's just coming into bloom, so it's probably not any more helpful than the ones on FCBS. 

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Sure you're not thinking of Androlepis with the ridged fruits? 
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Brod
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Aechmea lilacinantha


« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2011, 23:16:02 »

Andy, I'll try and take some close ups of my macvaughii. It's not in flower yet.
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Kerry T.
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2011, 23:48:08 »

Hey Andy and all.

I can't grow either Ursulaea to save myself, but I have photographed blooming specimens of others' who have warmer winters. Here ya go! (sorry, no pics of seed pods). 


U. macvaughii

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U. tuitensis

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I don't know if the berries have ridges, or not, either.

I removed my U. macvaughii photos I showed on GW yonks ago, because one showed up on U.S. eBay by a certain seller from P.R., without my permission. I asked him to remove it, but to no avail...

K ♥
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2011, 23:56:06 »

Awesome.  Thanks guys.
Lisa, I couldn't quite remember for sure if they did have ridges or not, but for some reason the idea was lodged in the back of my head.

Thanks Brod, the underside of the leaf and the spines at the leaf bases are of most interest.

And Kerry, how big was that?  How big do they get?  For some reason, I was under the impression that they were maybe 2-3x the size of tuitensis, but are they larger?
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Kerry T.
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« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2011, 00:37:29 »

Andy - U. macvaughii is a big bugga, maybe 4x larger than tuitensis. I think that photographed specimen of macvaughii was about 1.5 metres wide (5 feet).

I forgot to say I don't know how they grow in their natural habitat - whether epiphytically or lithophytically or as a terrestrial. Their leaves are quite succulent. Not much info on these obscure beauties.

K
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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2011, 00:49:40 »

Ok....that puts enough together.  For some reason I thought U. mcvaughii was about half the size that it is....the random questions will make sense when I get my next post together (I needed to check these things before getting tooooooo worked up and excited)....
-andy

ps-in doing some digging I saw it spelled both 'mac-' as well as 'mc-' and as the guy's name was McVaugh I assume that 'mcvaughii' should be the correct spelling?
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2011, 00:54:43 »

Oh wait, there's a photo of macvaughii's ripe fruit in the Baensch book!  I should have remembered that, since the genus was named after Ursula Baensch.  Do you have that, Andy, or do you want me to scan it?  They're yellow when ripe, no ridges, and the mac spelling is correct.
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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2011, 01:23:53 »

Ah, got it Lisa.  Thanks for pointing me to it.  And of course they would have two whole pages devoted to these two plants!

Hmmm, you are right, looking at S&D it is 'macvaughii'.  That is really strange.  I assumed it was named for Rogers McVaugh (but it does say it was also published as 'mcvaughii'...now I have to go and edit my first post again....).

And it is interesting to see that after Baensch and others described the genus Ursulaea in 1994ish there have been three articles with studies showing that it is not a valid genus and should be sunk back into Aechmea (Podaechmea).  I'd better get my pencil out and start writing....
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« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2011, 01:32:16 »

And the Aechmea skirmishes continue........  lump, split, lump, split, splump.   
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« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2011, 01:45:38 »

This pic of tuitensis is on wikipedia. Looks like ripe fruit to me.

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“If I could remember the names of all these particles, I'd be a botanist”, Enrico Fermi
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« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2011, 02:03:08 »

 ? tuitensis will grow better with a more terrestrial media .
Peters struggled up @Whyanbeel in a small tray of quincan .
Mike Symmons had one not doing much better , we talked about it
during one of my visits ages ago . And he tried it in a larger pot with some dirt [ as if  Roll Eyes ] He reported back that it was doing much better. Should be grown much like a Dyckia I reckon .
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« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2011, 02:52:52 »

It seems to grow OK in Brisbane.

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« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2011, 04:49:51 »

Thanks everyone.  Now there will be at least a little info compiled on these guys.  My U. tuitensis and the clone(s) that I have seen around in San Diego look like the ones in Kerry's pictures.  Baensch shows two forms...anyone have the more narrow leaved clone?  I was supposedly (ridiculously) close to the tuitensis in habitat last week and next time I swear I am going to find it.  I've heard it just makes carpets/mats over the granite boulders.  It kills me I didn't see it this time.  Here in San Diego they grow in just about any soil.  I am currently trying to root a pup on some lava rock.  Since they like growing on rocks, I'm hoping the lava rock will be a good enough compromise in our climate (for holding enough moisture).

That cultivated macvaughii look great Rick.  I don't know if anyone in SoCal grows them (I'm going to have to start hunting around).  Thanks again for your pics Kerry.  And the wikipedia pic strikes me as 'the other clone'.  Looks like an interesting one.
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