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Author Topic: where do you live?  (Read 12633 times)
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splinter1804
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« Reply #90 on: July 12, 2012, 01:24:49 »

Gooday Wal - Good to have another Aussie aboard even if he is a "cane toad" and not a "cockroach" (for international members, this is an Aussie Rugby League joke)

All the best, Nev.
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rayy
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« Reply #91 on: August 03, 2012, 05:27:36 »

Hervey Bay Queensland Australia.   Rayy
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JoshuaY
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« Reply #92 on: August 31, 2012, 13:44:24 »

I live in Indianapolis, IN, the weather is quite unpredictable!

Winters can get below 0f (-18C) but the summers can be in the mid 100's (37c).  We have moved up to USDA Zone 6.

Currently it's 75F with 85% humidity. 

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Debby
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« Reply #93 on: August 18, 2013, 01:47:13 »

I live in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at about 4,900 feet (the city covers an area where the low point is the Rio Grande and the high is the foothills of the Sandia Mountains). We have dry weather usually (aka drought) with warm to hot low-humidity summers; a rainy season (when it may nearly rain and humidity will rise); pleasant fall (complete with a hot-air balloon feista); winters that can have warm days and frigid days, usually clear skies and little snow in town (but snow in the mountains that makes a pretty sight). Spring seems to be over too quickly sometimes.

I started collecting Tillandsias in August of 2012, so I'm pleased to join this board and learn more. We have the altitude they like, the bright skies, and hummingbirds. My collection is summering on a north-facing porch with occasional visits for some to a very well, extremely sunny, south-west facing porch in the afternoons (sun seems too hot... but maybe it's the humidity we've had lately). This is exposure is to encourage thee plants, like the Xerographica, concolor and ionanthas, to remember the wild. I'll probably do this in the winter on nice days, too, since at that time they'll mostly be under artificial light inside.

I hope to be able to contribute to conversations now and then. Smiley
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sdandy
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« Reply #94 on: August 21, 2013, 02:12:56 »

Cool, you'll have to let us know how you learn to overwinter them best Debby.  I love Tillandsias also, but I have the fortune of growing them outdoors year round in San Diego.  But I am always curious about methods of growing them indoors in different climates.  Welcome and good luck!
-andy
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Anna
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« Reply #95 on: January 23, 2014, 06:38:54 »

Hi
I live in Pretoria East, Elarduspark.
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Palmtreehugger
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« Reply #96 on: January 30, 2014, 19:33:51 »

I live near Doheny Beach, California in San Clemente. We have pretty darn good weather year round. Grow Pinanga Kuhlii with no problem. Wouldn't mind a little warmer weather than we have seen the last few years but not complaining.
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Palmtreehugger
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« Reply #97 on: August 09, 2014, 18:32:26 »

My Wife and I live near Doheny Beach in Dana Point California.
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Peyton
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« Reply #98 on: September 23, 2014, 21:26:40 »

southern Louisiana!
about 30 miles from the Gulf of Mexico...
 Smiley
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Debby
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« Reply #99 on: March 19, 2015, 00:11:21 »

Cool, you'll have to let us know how you learn to overwinter them best Debby.  I love Tillandsias also, but I have the fortune of growing them outdoors year round in San Diego.  But I am always curious about methods of growing them indoors in different climates.  Welcome and good luck!
-andy

I'm just now checking this part of the forum! Last summer (2014), nearly all tillies sat in baskets or hung from string or wire or shoe strings in my north-facing porch, getting very little direct sun and, since it was rainer than usual, a little natural rain. The skies are very bright with a lot of reflected light, so I think they were all happy. As it began to cool in, I think, late September or so, I brought them in. The smaller ones (ionanthas, soft-gray strictas, etc) I put under a shop light with a cool white and a grow-light lightbulbs (tubes). they are doing okay. Some I put in a terrarium-like container made from an acrylic aquarium. They'll be happier in a few months when they go outside again, but only the butziis suffered, but I think they are just something I can't grow anyhow. My larger plants (the heaviest being a Xero), the longest being some Spanish Moss, and lots of other large ones, I have on wire (for making jewelry, no copper) and they are hanging in my south-facing window [I should take pictures...], which I also cover with plastic since the window material is cheap. I finally got the landscapers to cut down a tall hedge, so I have had a lot of sun in that window all winter long. I like to think the plants there have been pleasantly surprised. None seem to have suffered. They all are soaked at least once a week for 1.5 hours. Over these months quite a few of the ionanthas have colored up and bloomed, one of the soft gray strictas bloomed, and now two of the filifolias (which may not be filifolias, I'll have to research that) -- they have thrown up delicate stocks. Once theses bloom, I'll take pictures and see about posting them here for identification purposes.

While we have had an unusual winter (~Feb 26-28 we got 9" of snow -- it all melted off by March 2) and it's been cold, we haven't had our usual wind. I'm not complaining, it's just odd. While days are almost warm enough now, I want to wait until evenings are no less than 50F before I put any delicate plants out. I think my neighbors here in my apartment complex really enjoyed seeing the unusual plants; I hope to thrill them again this season. Maybe I can make some converts -- and give away some ionanthas and soft gray strictas! 

Also, we had a wife/husband team who live in the mountains north of Albuquerque (the Jemez Mountains) where they grow Tillies and make herbal medications and cosmetics. They would set up a booth almost every weekend at our nearby growers market (10th and Central if you are in Albuquerque). We have become good friends and I hope to see them again this year at the market. I sure don't think I need any more plants, but they're hard to resist! My friends apparently went to Seattle last fall and probably did a lot of Tillie shopping. Were it not for Fukushima radiation hitting the West Coast of the USA, I almost wish I could have gone with them  Cheesy
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #100 on: March 19, 2015, 17:55:47 »

Hi Debby,

My heart goes out to all who have to battle the elements to grow Broms and Tillies. I am most grateful that I only have a slight wind problem and maybe a little too much rain. On a point you mentioned regarding the husband and wife team growing Tillies for herbal remedies. Now that is interesting! You could not perhaps get them to tell of what they are used for and what they do? I have studied our local (South African) flora for herbal uses and we have an abundance of remedies here! I don't think I would sacrifice a Tillie for a remedy! But it would be interesting!

Best wishes and warmer days ahead!

Conrad
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