Bromeliad Forum
June 27, 2017, 12:26:05 *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

News: Change your Profile, Photo etc by clicking on the Profile button above
 
   Home   Help Forum Rules Login Register  
Del.icio.us Digg FURL FaceBook Stumble Upon Reddit SlashDot

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How do you grow your bromeliad seed ?  (Read 172 times)
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
splinter1804
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Hobbies: I belong to the Illawarra Bromeliad Society as well as the Illawarra Light Railway Museum Society and we restore and operate old 2' gauge steam and diesel locomotives and associated rolling stock
Posts: 1383



« on: April 26, 2017, 08:20:43 »

Hi everyone.

I’d like you all to consider this thread as an information gathering exercise about different ways of growing bromeliad seed for the average back yard grower who doesn’t have access to any fancy equipment or temperature controlled green houses and suchlike.

I’ll start with my own experiences both successful and unsuccessful as I feel we can all learn from both outcomes.

My first attempt was to squeeze some Neoregelia seed directly from the freshly harvested capsule onto the top of the potting mix which the Mother plant was growing in. After a few days the seed had vanished; probably washed down between the bits of bark in the mix or washed out of the pot altogether as this was just a “half-hearted” attempt one day purely out of curiosity to see if seed would germinate in this way. Unfortunately I didn’t think things through and never thought about the effects of water on the seed. Although I was careful when watering, I didn’t take into consideration the effects of heavy rain.

Next I topped up the Mother plant’s potting mix with a finer potting mix so the seeds couldn’t wash through and tried again.  This time I moved the plant to an area that wouldn’t get wet if it rained and I made sure I was careful to water it gently. After a couple of weeks nothing had happened and I lost interest and stopped manually watering them although that area still got wet from the micro misters I put on occasionally.

It wasn’t until about a month later when I was poking around the bench cleaning up I noticed something green on the top of the potting mix which I initially mistook for moss until I looked closer and then I saw there were hundreds of little germinating seeds. Not knowing what I was doing I had squeezed the seed out of probably a dozen or so capsules; far too much as I later came to realise.

They grew to about three or four millimetres high and were doing quite well until a visiting stray cat knocked the pot off the bench and spilled the lot and I didn’t find it for a couple of days until I went to water them. Fortunately, because I had sown so much seed I was easily able to find a few dozen tiny plants and relocate them onto the mix in another pot, and here they just seemed to sit and do nothing.

I usually only water once a week in summer and every two weeks in winter and it became a bit of a nuisance having to mist spray these seedlings every day and I forgot more often than I remembered and finally I lost interest and forgot all about them, and consequently they finally dried out and died.

I decided I had to find a way to grow seed that didn’t require so much manual watering and that’s when I hit on the idea of the plastic take-away containers with the lids on. I half-filled a couple with damp fine Coir Peat, sowed the seed on top and mist sprayed them with a hand sprayer to settle the seed into the mix, put the lids on and put them on a shelf in a closed in back porch where they got good light but were protected from the elements.

The rest is history, and I’ve raised hundreds of seedling in this way since. I found that once the lid was on, I didn’t have to water at all, as the condensation built up on the underside of the lid during the night and trickled back down the sides of the containers during the day thus providing a self-watering system.

They weren’t very fast growing (probably very slow by the standards of other more experienced growers) and took almost a year to reach the underside of the lid and that’s when they were transplanted.

Here's some Billbergia seedlings happily growing in the take away containers.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

At this stage I’m still using that method as it suits me and it's suitable for all types of bromeliad seed except Tillandsia seed; but I’m sure there are a great number of much better methods than this being used by other growers, and that’s what this thread aims to try and find out.

All the best, Nev.



Logged
splinter1804
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Hobbies: I belong to the Illawarra Bromeliad Society as well as the Illawarra Light Railway Museum Society and we restore and operate old 2' gauge steam and diesel locomotives and associated rolling stock
Posts: 1383



« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2017, 08:36:40 »

Hi everyone.

It appears that starting this thread was a complete waste of time as it seems no one is prepared to share their knowledge on bromeliad seed growing with us........Oh well, you win some and you lose some.

All the best, Nev.
Logged
Premium Advert
jaga
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 713



« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2017, 09:04:30 »

Nev, That's not quite true my friend....., Im in the process of doing a post on this, did some seed about a week back and are waiting for it to germinate so I can show the steps, will be another 3 weeks or so. I have other examples but shown them before so no point doing a repeat.

Patience required to grow broms so a bit of waiting is required, my seed had better germinate other wise will be in the gun, Lol.

-John
Logged
No ads for the duration of the month!!!

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

splinter1804
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Hobbies: I belong to the Illawarra Bromeliad Society as well as the Illawarra Light Railway Museum Society and we restore and operate old 2' gauge steam and diesel locomotives and associated rolling stock
Posts: 1383



« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2017, 22:24:43 »

Hi everyone.

John - Sorry if I appeared to be having a go at you as that was definitely not my intention. My aim was to get some of the many people who read these threads to get off their collective bums and share some of their knowledge with the few of us trying to keep this forum going.

I know I've appealed before by asking people to share pictures or info about their collections without success and thought I would try approaching from a different angle using seed raising as the topic.

I certainly didn't intend to insult any of the "good guys"

All the best, Nev.
Logged
Kayleen C
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Australia Australia

Other Plants I Grow: Natives, tropicals
Posts: 454



« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2017, 09:33:37 »

Sorry my computer had a hissy fit. I rang Acer and they were very helpful but couldn't do anything as it needs to go to a repairer. The only thing with that is it will probably ending up nearly the same price as a new one. Must download all my pics to hard drive.
Well the computer run it's own repair finally, and looks like all is working but I have no curser so have to use a mouse. All good as I hate the curser anyway.

Nev I grow my seed the same as you but use peat as the medium.
I don't 1/2 fill, maybe a third.
I don't wash seed either.
When the plants are big enough to have the lid off, I get Dale to drill holes in the bottom so they don't fill up with water.
I will start to fertilise a bit then and again when I plant out into bigger trays. I use potting mix for that, and use the brom mix when I pot up separately.
Logged

Save water, shower with a friend.
splinter1804
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Hobbies: I belong to the Illawarra Bromeliad Society as well as the Illawarra Light Railway Museum Society and we restore and operate old 2' gauge steam and diesel locomotives and associated rolling stock
Posts: 1383



« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2017, 21:56:13 »

Hi everyone.

Kayleen - I've found computers are similar to cars, great when they are working OK and a pain in the bum when they aren't; and have you noticed, they always seem to break down just when you need them the most. 

I lost a lot of pictures many years ago when my old computer crashed, and due to inexperience I didn't have any of them saved on a separate device. I quickly learned my lesson and now back-up important pictures on an external hard drive while with the less important stuff I save on thumb drives.

You see I can't save anything on this old computer as there is some "glitch" in it which hides any files saved to the "C" drive every time I restart it. Somewhere in this machine there are thousands of pictures and lots of documents but I can't find them and I'm not paying a technician a fortune to look for them for me as fortunately they are all now backed up. Although I can't afford a new computer, I can still get by with a bit of good old fashioned improvisation, I just have to remember which thumb drive has what on it.

Now back on topic again, sorry for the detour. Thanks for the feed-back; it seems we only vary slightly in our methods with you using Peat Moss and me using Coir Peat. I’ve never compared the two products but found initially I got good results with the Coir Peat and so I stuck with that.

The other thing is that Coir Peat is a renewable resource where as true Peat Moss takes thousands of years for nature to make. The other “upside” of Coir Peat is that we are making use of an otherwise waste product which helps poorer countries by the money made from its sales.

I found that it was easier to cut drainage slots in the bottom edge of the containers with an angle grinder rather than drill holes in the bottom, however both methods use power tools so you need to be careful in what you are doing.

When you fertilise, do you use the manufactures recommended strength or do you reduce it for the very small seedlings?

It will be interesting to see how John does his seed after all he is the “Guru” of this small group and has many more “runs on the board” with the seedlings he has bred and registered. It’s just a bit disappointing that not more people are participating in this discussion as it could make for a very interesting topic.

All the best, Nev

Logged
jaga
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 713



« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2017, 13:03:01 »

Hi all, still overseas at the moment. In Vietnam. Back on board soon. No Broms here that I can see.
Logged
splinter1804
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Hobbies: I belong to the Illawarra Bromeliad Society as well as the Illawarra Light Railway Museum Society and we restore and operate old 2' gauge steam and diesel locomotives and associated rolling stock
Posts: 1383



« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2017, 06:26:17 »

Hi everyone.

John - My son tells me orchids do very well there, so I naturally thought there would be plenty of brom's there as well as they seem to go hand in hand with orchids everywhere else................... I guess we live and learn.

All the best, Nev.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP © Copyright Bromeliad & Airplant Forum | Hosted By GTS Designs
Powered by SMF 1.1.10 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC | Sitemap
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!