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Author Topic: Species Neo  (Read 614 times)
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jaga
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« on: January 14, 2017, 09:53:12 »

Mini unnamed species Neo flowering today.

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Cheers John.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2017, 09:57:31 by jaga » Logged
Kayleen C
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« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2017, 12:39:35 »

Very nice. Beautiful colour of the flower.
I was surprised to see so much colour in the plant as many species I have are just green.
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jaga
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« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2017, 19:36:33 »

Yes Elton lemi is yet to name this, I think there was speculation that it was a variant of ampulacea. The blue flower is very similar.

John.
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splinter1804
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« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2017, 21:42:46 »

Hi everyone.

John – I don’t know how, but I somehow seemed to have missed this post, anyway better late than never.

That’s certainly a very attractive little Neo. and the shade of blue of the flowers is most unusual and a great contrast to the foliage colour. Too bad you don’t live in Shellharbour or I’d be hopping the fence for a bit.

I’ve noticed with many of the mini Neo species, that the flowers are much larger in proportion to the size of the plant than they are with standard Neo’s. Also they are higher up in the central vase and well clear of the water.

I have a mini which was given to me years ago as a “mini species”, no other name. It’s only small, about 3” high with dark green leaves with purple spotting which isn’t all that unattractive, but the best bit is the flowers which are pale mauve and white and contrast nicely with the foliage, unfortunately they don’t last long.  I’ve never got a definite ID for it although some have suggested it could be one of the ampullaceas.

I’m not up to speed on mini species so I’m attaching a pic. and if anyone has an ID for me I’d be glad to get it.

All the best, Nev.

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jaga
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« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2017, 03:52:45 »

Hi all. Nev the one I show has flowered a few time before but this is the first time the flowers have pretuded this amount, also with the flower stigma protruding through the anthers. In the past there has been very little pollen but this time there was plenty. So I have to put this down to the conditions. Both my plants were outside but decided to use one in a hanging pot, both been in our warm conservatory where temps are at 30 if fully ventilated. Any way have tried some hybridisation as you can see.

Your plant, not sure, have you tried getting a ID in the species FB group. I'm sure Peter Tristan will have a answer. ?

John
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splinter1804
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« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2017, 18:45:37 »

Hi everyone.

John - I still can't get past the beautiful powder blue colour of your flowers, really eye catching. There's no doubt that in the end everything comes down to growing conditions; and the fact that you also grow it in your observatory as well as outside has to be a big plus. Where I have multiples of the same plant I always grow them in different areas and it's interesting to see the variation both in growth and colour, and even sometimes in flowering times and the flower quality.

I've never worried much about IDing that one of mine as I didn't consider it all that important, but now with all the recent discussion about unnamed and wrongly named plants, it's probably time I did something about it. Your suggestion about posting it on the species site on Face Book is a good one and I'll post it today, and it will be interesting to see what results I get.

All the best, Nev.
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jaga
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« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2017, 19:32:03 »

Nev I do have a plant called Neoregelia ampulacea speckles, that does look similar. Will go get a image of it to compare. I see your posting on FB and have invited Graeme to comment.

John.
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jaga
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« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2017, 03:46:38 »

Hi all, image of a Neo ampulacea speckle. This ones been in the shade. I will put one in the sun so we can compare once it colours up.

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John.
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splinter1804
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« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2017, 22:03:11 »

Hi everyone.

John - My plant has a very different form to yours and not as open. I dug up an old Photo Bucket picture of a similar plant both in size and form for comparison, the only difference is that my plant has shorter stolons.(See below)

I posted on three different Face Book sites, "Planet Neoregelia", "Bromeliad Species Group" and the "Mini Neoregelia Fan Page" and I've had a very good response.

Based on what Graeme Barclay and Grant Paterson say, its seems very much like it is a Neo. ampullacea after all and that's what I'll be putting on the name tag. Thanks for your input and suggesting I put it on Face Book in the first place, it certainly got a good response.

A picture put on by one lady looked almost identical except the flowers were much darker, however according to her it was a hybrid called Neo. 'Blackberry'. When I looked it up on the BCR the picture looked nothing like the picture of the plant she posted and I suggested to her that maybe she had the same plant as me which I'm pretty sure is a species and hers isn't Neo.'Blackberry' after all, but a species NOID like mine.

Although this is a different plant, it's the same size and shape as my NOID, the only difference being the stolons on this plant are longer

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All the best, Nev
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splinter1804
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« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2017, 21:47:27 »

Hi everyone.

John – Well, I’ve had a great response from Face Book and based on what I have so far, I’m inclined to lean toward my plant being one of the Neo. ampullacea species.

As you probably have already read;  Grant Andrew Paterson said, “I have this one as ampulacea hyb NZ ex Bea Hansen NZ. imported by Grace Goode in the 1980's”. So this would explain it being in Australia.

Graeme Barclay says, “Yes I think most likely a clone of ampullacea. Some can be spotty like this with zonated banded on the undersides. One trait they should all have though is those largish mauve-blue edged petals with whitish centres. The flowers can be over an inch long, quite large for a small species.”

His comment about the flowers describes exactly the flower size on my plant which to me seemed abnormal in comparison to the size of the plant.

At this stage I was all set to accept that it is Neo. ampullacea as I originally suspected, until Geoff Lawn posted an interesting  comment.

For anyone on this forum who doesn’t know of Geoff Lawn, he is the hard working Australian registrar of the BSI Bromeliad Cultivar Register.

Geoff says, “It's probably one of the many forms of Neo ampullacea. I see dark cross-banding on the far left leaf reverse and a side shot of the rosette could confirm this point. It's probably the ampullacea form Grace Goode used quite a bit in her mini crosses, claiming in error that it was N. punctatissima, a species only relatively recently claimed by Elton Leme to have recently collected in the wild (some dispute this I.D.). I have saved your photo and will ask Uncle Derek's opinion. There are so many mini Neo hybrids around now that the original species forms are becoming harder to find and identify."
 
The dark cross-banding on the far left leaf reverse is something I never even noticed, however Graeme obviously did as he comments on it also; I guess this is due to my very limited experience in looking at the finer details when trying to ID a plant.

Geoff received feedback from Derek Butcher which opens up a completely new line of investigation. For people who don’t know of Derek, he was another of the hard working BCR Registrars and the one who kept things running before Geoff took over the reins. He is more commonly known to many as “Uncle Derek” and has written numerous articles on bromeliads and their identification and taxonomy.

Derek says, “it looks like what we renamed Neo 'Punctate', a known form of N. ampullacea once mistakenly thought to be N. punctatissima. Derek says if Neville is really keen, he should try keying out the inflorescence”. See: http://registry.bsi.org/?fields=Name&id=6500&search=punctate

My answer to Derek was, “I'm not that keen and besides my eyes and my hands don't work that well anymore.”

This throws more information into the equation and more things to consider as I try for an accurate ID.

Any comments?

All the best, Nev
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