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Author Topic: Aechmea disjuncta  (Read 736 times)
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Kayleen C
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« on: November 30, 2016, 08:29:49 »

It is slowly growing around the tree trunk.




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splinter1804
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« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2016, 23:20:02 »

Hi everyone.

Kayleen - It seems to like that tree; what sort of tree is it?

All the best, Nev
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jaga
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« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2016, 06:26:57 »

Wow!, Kayleen that Aechmea is doing well, healthy and lush. Can see in a few more years the truck section of the tree will be covered! Just goes to show you if you put them in there natural habitat they do well. Most of the broms we are growing in soil prefer this environment and to date all the ones I have tried in our trees have also done very well. have you put any more in trees?

-John
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splinter1804
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« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2016, 22:32:31 »

Hi everyone.

John – I couldn’t agree with you more; many people forget that most of the brom’s we grow (except the true terrestrials) naturally grow on trees or rocks and that we only grow them in pots for our own convenience. 

I have Neo’s and Aechmeas growing on an old half dead Peppercorn Tree and a friend from our Bromeliad Club has a large tree hosting many Nidulariums and Guzmanias while another friend has a giant fifteen year old plant of Vr. Phillipo Coburgii living right at the top of a large tree and currently in full flower. It looks great with the afternoon sun shining on it and showing through the red tips of the leaves. It’s just unfortunate that not more of us have trees on which to grow these plants naturally.

A few years back when our old Peppercorn Tree started to die, I cut back the dead sections and mounted a few bits of recurvata on the branches and a couple of Ae. fasciata pups in the main fork.

After about two years the tree decided to start growing again and consequently the plants were lost from sight. Last year the foliage again started to die and it was amazing to see just how much of the tree these plants had taken over.

The fasciata is well and truly established after about five years


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And the recurvatas are also starting to climb the branches after about the same time in situ.

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Even if the foliage all dies I'll still have a great bromeliad totem pole to look at.

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All the best, Nev.
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2016, 10:28:51 »

Yes John I have quiet a few in trees. They are all doing well.
Nev the tree name escapes me and google didn't show it.
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jaga
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« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2016, 20:49:40 »

Wow! Nev a great result there! you put up a image last year of your  fasciata and I was inspired then to try one but some how it never happened, so this is back on the urgent to do list'. Those images are great with the red flower contrasting with the blue sky. Pity about your peppercorn tree though!, the question is will the broms survive if the tree is dead as my understanding is they need living trees, something to do with the root contact with the bark. had one die on me and all the well attached broms fell off so believe it is possible that it will happen.

-John
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« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2016, 22:09:37 »

Hi everyone.

John - I have a friend who planted some Ae. recurvata on some dead tree limbs from a Bottle Brush tree (Callistemon) which he had cut from a dead tree and mounted on his side fence as a feature.

The plants attached themselves just as quickly as mine did on my old Peppercorn tree and have been growing there happily for the past two years, but then Callistemon bark is much more suitable as a host for plants as it's wonderfully rough with grooves and channels through it for roots to attach to.

I have found that recurvata and fasciata are great plants for mounting as they seem to accept almost anything as a host. I tried them both on a mixed heap of rocks and rubble I had which comprised mainly bits of sandstone, broken concrete and broken bricks; I just positioned them and put a few bits of rock around them to add stability, and they took root in no time at all. In fact, they proved quite a headache when it was time to re-locate them to other sites as the roots were all firmly attached to the larger bits of rocks.

This led to me trying (out of curiosity) to grow a Neoregelia pup in 3/8” scoria and nothing else. As it was an inert media I knew it needed some type of added nourishment for the pup, but all it got was bit of foliar fertiliser when the other nearby plants got the same. The root growth after six months was most surprising (see Pic 1) and far surpassed what I had expected.

When I said my Peppercorn tree was dead, maybe I should have said "half dead" as it appears to be once again “bouncing back” and producing new growth. This is what it did a couple of years ago and as it grew it hid the brom's, and as they didn't get any light, they just remained a grey/green in colour and it wasn’t until the foliage again started to die from the top of the tree that the colour returned to the plants. I hope they don’t fall off as the mind boggles at just how many plants are now established there and I have no idea where I could re-locate them too as there isn’t any spare space in the yard.

There is also a large clump of Neoregelia which I was given many years ago and as far as ID goes, I was just told “It’s supposed to be a species”. It was originally put on the tree as it was what I call “a nothing looking plant” as it was devoid of attractive colour and was just a dirty green colour with touches of brown on the foliage. One thing it did have going for it though, was the flowers; they are the purest, whitest white I have ever seen on a Neoregelia. If the rain stops I’ll try and get a pic today and post it tomorrow. Maybe someone can help me with an ID.

Before I go, I have an “off topic” ID request; a friend of mine bought this unusual, unnamed orchid a while back and I was wondering if anyone here might be able to ID it for her. (See Pic's 2 and 3)

All the best, Nev.

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jaga
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« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2016, 20:01:55 »

Hi Nev, thanks for above Info. Also see you got your answer on FB re the orchid ID.

Cheers John.
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2016, 11:53:54 »

Did you get the same answer as I sent you Nev?
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splinter1804
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« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2016, 19:55:14 »

Hi everyone.

Kayleen – The ID you found was the right genus (Lockhartia) but a different species (chocoensis). It was in fact Lockhartia oerstedii which was identified by Barry Landau and later confirmed by several orchid growers.

From that information I was able to search Google and came up with this site which shows a great picture of it: http://www.orchidspecies.com/lockhartiaoerstedii.htm   

Strangely, I mentioned it to a brom/orchid growing friend the next night and he immediately identified it and said he had three pots of it and had grown it for years; so it seems I should have started my search closer to home.

All the best, Nev.
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2016, 12:18:46 »

All good. Glad you got a positive ID.
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