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Author Topic: Plastic house colaspe!  (Read 963 times)
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jaga
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« on: November 16, 2016, 19:24:19 »

Went to do some watering last night and found this, Its not the 7.8 earthquake, just to much weight in plants on top + the use of untreated timber. It's lasted 10 years so can't complain.
Closest side in the 1st image shows its completely buckled and flattened all that's within. Going to be a job to clear all this.

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John
« Last Edit: November 16, 2016, 19:34:32 by jaga » Logged
splinter1804
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« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2016, 04:47:14 »

Hi everyone.

Johjn - Oops, what a terrible surprise. Hopefully there wasn't too much damage to the plants underneath. I had a similar thing happen to me some years ago, but fortunately I was on the spot when it happened and was able to lift the collapsed bench off the plants underneath immediately and was surprised to find very little serious damage; so I hope you end up with a similar result.

All the best, Nev.
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2016, 20:11:38 »

Sympathies John!

The few disasters I have had in my garden have always led me to do better things. Take this opportunity to make a stronger greenhouse, and have fun doing it!

Please post pictures of the rebuild.

Conrad
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2016, 10:55:50 »

Not good John. Hope there wasn't too much damage to your plants.
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jaga
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2016, 10:12:21 »

Hi all, got a chance to look it over today, its a bit of a mess, a few broms got squashed but most seem OK. The timber frame is not repairable so have started on a replacement.

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Replacement frame in treated timber so every face needs to be sealed to stop the copper leaching on to the broms.
Some of the rotten bits in front with the 1st new painted frame behind.

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Cheers John.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 10:23:00 by jaga » Logged
splinter1804
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2016, 21:19:17 »

Hi everyone.

John - It looks like you have quite a job ahead of you there, what sort of paint are you using?

After I had a problem with my previously painted  treated pine I asked a paint sales rep. what was the best paint to use on treated timber to prevent leaching and he told me you fist needed to prime it with a good quality oil based primer and then a coat of good quality oil based undercoat. It could then be finished with an oil based high or low gloss or a good quality acrylic.

The reason for the oil based primer and undercoat is that he said that’s the only way to properly seal it, as with all acrylic paints, moisture can pass through them to some degree, this is why to get the best bond on brickwork you can damp it down first before applying acrylic and it's even possible to apply the paint before the brickwork is completely dry as it dries from the inside out unlike the oil based paint that dries from the outside in.This proves that moisture can pass through it both ways and if this is the case then copper can pass through it also.

This explained why with treated pine I had previously painted with just acrylic paint I was still getting damage from leached copper to plants on benches below the painted timbers and I had to do it all again with oil based paints after which I've had no more problems. 

Another point many people overlook is to make sure you seal all the cut ends before they are assembled as the copper can also leach from these if they aren’t sealed. I paid the price for not sealing the cut ends before I assembled mine as it was something I just never thought about.

This was information from just one paint sales rep. and others may have a different opinion as many believe acrylic paint will seal anything; however I found out differently, and after following this advice I haven’t had any problems since and I pass it on to you for what it's worth.

All the best, Nev.
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jaga
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« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2016, 08:56:02 »

Yes Nev you are on the money!, but in reverse, one coat of all purpose exterior primer + oil based top coat. The Top coat is called 'Silver Sheen' from Dulux. Its a complete sealer and I have tested it many times. Its a zinc rich product used for timber and metal, also covers over all staining and permanently stops any leaching.
I would still have preferred to have used untreated timber or hardwood but untreated no longer exists here and hardwood is 3 times the cost so not worth it for a temporary structure.

Some pics

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Cheers, John
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splinter1804
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« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2016, 22:09:23 »

Hi everyone.

John - I didn't know they still made Dulux Silver Sheen; when I worked at the steelworks they used gallons of the stuff (it came in 44 gallon drums) as a primer undercoat on all of the metal work; I never thought of using it on timber.

The reason I said an oil based prime and undercoat was that was what I was told by the paint rep. He said it was important to use oil based for the first two coats as that penetrated the timber and helped preserve it whereas the multi-purpose acrylic primer/undercoats just stayed on the surface and didn't penetrate and therefore didn't help in preserving the timber.

Keep up the good work.

All the best, Nev.
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