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Author Topic: Jan 2017 NZ brom meeting  (Read 341 times)
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jaga
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« on: February 01, 2017, 07:27:54 »

Hi all, here's s few images of plants there. We hold a meeting once a month so am going to show off plants for the meets we attend.

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Enjoy - John
« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 21:24:04 by jaga » Logged
splinter1804
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« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2017, 21:21:26 »

John - That's a great idea to post pic's of plants appearing at your meeting. Not only does it let us see plants we may not be familiar with,(such as the aechmea in picture 4 [in my case anyway]) but it also helps to promote your club.

We have our first meeting for the year this Saturday (We don't meet in January as there are usually too many people away on holidays etc.) so I'll have to try to remember to take my camera along. There's been too many occasions where there's been an unusual or rare plant brought to a meeting and I’ve kicked myself for not having my camera to record it. (No I don’t have a mobile phone either, my phone is still attached to the wall with a wire and doesn’t take pictures).

John I’m interested in the Aechmea in picture 4 as it’s one I’ve never seen or heard of before, and consequently, I went searching to see what I could find. I was rewarded for my search with some great pictures on the F.C.B.S. Species Photo Index where it appears as No. 1 on the species list.

It seems it’s a species from Equador and there are four great pictures posted by Wally Berg and Ken Marks showing them growing epiphytically in habitat as well as in culture. The first two were posted by Wally Berg who between 1987 and 1995 together with friends made a total of 9 trips to Ecuador. As well as the 4 pictures of the plants, there is a link to an article which photographically records these trips via numerous pictures of the country and the habitat; all in all it’s a very informative record and the next best thing to us being there in person.   

The main thing that strikes me about these plants is the disproportionate length of the stolons in relation to the size of the plant. Without knowing the actual plant size, but assuming it’s about medium to small size, it would seem these stolons are close to 30cm long. They appear even longer on the cultivated plants in the first picture posted by Ken Marks as they radiate from the plant and take on a pendulous habit. It’s a pity that the picture of what appears to be buds isn’t very clear and flower colour can't be seen.

John, have you ever seen this plant in flower and if so could you tell us more, e.g. flower colour? 

The plant in the last two pictures is quite “eye catching”; is it Vriesea gutinosa ? I’m not really up to speed with Vrieseas, but the foliage looks similar to a pup I have with that name.   

Thanks for sharing

All the best, Nev. 
 
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jaga
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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2017, 02:58:21 »

HI ALL, Nev the meeting had a very informative talk by our chairman Graeme Barclay on Aechmea and the now 9 sub species with most of these plants belong to Graeme. Image 5 is the top view of image 4. no I haven't seen this plant flower and like you have never seen it before. The reason its classified as a Aechmea is because the flower sepals have a sharp point even though its gives the overall appearance of being a neoregelia.

There were a lot of species on the table I had not seen before and probably should have photographed them all, mostly plants that Graeme has imported, so we are lucky to have them here.

The variegated one is Vriesea Galaxy. was tuff competition, the Aechmea Samari won.

John
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2017, 12:58:57 »

Some nice plants there John.
Good idea. I will have to remember to take my camera along to the meetings.
John is it a competition.?
We have just changed ours comp to New categories based on Genus rather than experience.
Categories are now Tillandsia, Neoregelia, Other Genus (e.g. Aechmea, Hohenbergia) and Flowering/In flower.

Will be interesting to see how it goes as we have a few big growers in our club so hope the little bloke still gets a look in.
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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2017, 21:11:47 »

Hi everyone.

John – We are indeed fortunate when we have members in our societies with large collections and a vast knowledge of the plants within their collections; but more importantly members who are willing to share this knowledge with the other members of our societies. In my opinion, these people are the “unsung heroes” that keep these organisations going as it’s from them that we gain much important information which we can use to build our own knowledge.

What you say about the similarity between the  Ae. Aculeatosepala and a Neoregelia  is exactly what I thought when I first saw it, and even when I saw the pictures of it growing in habitat, to me it still looked like a Neoregelia and I wondered how it could possibly be classed as an Aechmea. 

When you explain the reason for its Aechmea classification, it all makes sense, but how many of us would have picked up on that minor point? It’s valuable “snippets” of information like this that demonstrate the important role that knowledgeable growers like Graeme are able to share with us that makes their role within a society so very important.

A puzzling thing occurred with your post, because when I looked at it yesterday, the two picture of Vr. ‘Galaxy’ were the last shown. However, when I opened it up this morning I see there are two more Vrieseas shown after them. So if you’re thinking I’ve “lost the rest of my marbles” when I said that the last two pictures looked a bit like Vr. glutinosa, I wasn’t referring to what are now the last two pictures, which look nothing like Vr. glutinosa.

It seems I was partly right with my suspicions about the plant in those two pictures looking like Vr. glutinosa because when I looked up Vr. ‘Galaxy’ on the BCR I see it’s a CV of glutinosa anyway, which surprisingly is shown to have originated in Hungary.
 See: http://registry.bsi.org/?genus=VRIESEA&id=8611#8611

We too have a guest speaker at our meeting today and I’m told he will give an informative Power Point Presentation on ‘pH and fertilization of potted bromeliads’, in particular those bromeliads that prefer low nitrogen; including Neoregelias, Aechmeas and Billbergias.  He will also talk about the different types of fertilizer - solid and liquid organics and controlled release and soluble inorganics, so it should be a very interesting presentation.

Kayleen – Our monthly competition still follows the old “Popular Vote” style used since our society was founded, and which is also still used by many Orchid Societies. It is a separate competition to our Annual Show and the points for the monthly competition are quite separate and one competition has nothing to do with the other.

We have three sections, Open, Novice and Tillandsia. Members get three small voting cards “O”, “N” and “T”; (one for each section) and on these slips they vote for the plant in each section which they like the most by writing the number which is attached to the plant they wish to vote for.

After voting, the votes are counted and places 1st, 2nd and 3rd allocated. These points are tallied up at the end of the year and the winner receives a trophy. The reason there is a separate section for Tillandsia is that there were far more of this genus than any other when the society was founded and it remains much the same today with this section always the most supported.

Another very popular part of this competition is the plant discussion or "Show and Tell". This is where a couple of our experienced growers will discus in general, each of the plants benched with the plant owner also adding extra information about their method of culture and the particular plant's "likes" and "dislikes" as well. This segment is very important, especially for newer members and members who don't grow these particular plants as they have the opportunity to ask questions and gather more knowledge to store in their personal "memory bank". 

All the best, Nev.
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jaga
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« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2017, 07:05:10 »

Sorry all for the lack of response, we are busy organising plants for our Fiesta sale in Auckland this coming weekend, here's a few we are selling,

Neo 'Jags Volition'
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Neo 'Jags Bengal Tiger'
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Neo 'Jags Rage'
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Various, all our hybrids
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2 Neo 'Royal Hawaiian' x skotak tiger plants off our roof.

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assorted pups off our hybrids.

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enjoy and come along if new are a lurker and live in New Zealand!!

-John
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2017, 12:40:20 »

Lovely plants John. Saw them on the FB page.
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splinter1804
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« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2017, 21:37:54 »

Hi everyone.

John – You’re getting quite a build-up of stock there and I’m sure you won’t have any trouble selling them seeing they’re all your own hybrids and buyers are always looking for something different that isn’t usually readily available.

Personally I’d “blow” my money on the two Neo 'Royal Hawaiian' x ‘Skotak’s Tiger’ hybrids in picture 8. I think they’ve got nice shape, nice colour clarity and most of all I love the very dark (almost black) leaf tips.

Is there any hint of the “Skotak Tiger” markings on the underside of the leaves John?

Kayleen – What Face Book page was that? I’m afraid there are just so many bromeliad pages on Face Book I never get time to go through them all which is one of the drawbacks of face Book in my opinion; far easier to keep up with things when they were all in the one forum like they were pre-Face Book.

All the best, Nev
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jaga
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« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2017, 01:04:19 »

Hi all, thanks for the comments.

Nev, you there is a lot of zonation on the under side + the younger top leaves. The markings tend to burn off in high light. I have just crossed ,'Jags Royal Tiger' to enhance this trait.
I posted on the Kiwi bromelaid FB group.

Cheers John.
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