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Author Topic: Damping off / raising from seed  (Read 534 times)
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dan
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« on: September 28, 2016, 11:05:07 »

Good evening,


Just a short question about raising from seed.

In the past I have succeeded very well with  wet sphagnum moss in a takeaway container without drainage (no fungicide). I probably should have stuck with what I knew.

This time I got a bit loose with my method and mixed together sphagnum, peat moss and perlite to see how that goes.

Though after some reading it looks like this might increase the risk of damping off/fungal attack? From what I read Sphagnum has a natural  protection against fungi whereas peat moss is susceptible.

So I lightly sprayed the seeds with a mix of this (didn't look copper based or anything):

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What do you think about prospects? Or have I killed them? Or more generally, has anyone noticed certain seed raising mediums having high rates of failure due to fungi?

Probably should have done a container of each medium if I was being scientific about it.

Kind regards


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jaga
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« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2016, 21:59:04 »

Hi Dan, before giving my input on your question can you tell us, are using bagged dried sphagnum or is it fresh living sphagnum?. I ask this because the bagged one no longer has any protection, only the living version does.

In short I did use sphagnum but found it very difficult to control the fungi and reverted to a seived fine soil seed raising mix for all. I use Milton tablets to control any algie/fungi. A friend of mine does grow sphagnum and says its excellent for differcult to grow broms.
- John
« Last Edit: September 28, 2016, 22:06:23 by jaga » Logged
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dan
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« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2016, 23:17:55 »

Hi John. It is just the bagged dry stuff that i use. Thanks
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dan
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« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2016, 23:39:12 »

This is the stuff I use here in Aus.


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jaga
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« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2016, 01:37:49 »

Yes Dan, so it has no ability to stop algae or fungus and mixed with other mediums will generally hasten the process hence your dilemma above. I'm not sure about the product your trying, since you live in Aust maybe Nev/Kayleen knows about this but sadly similar products I have tried has simply killed not only the infection but also the seedlings. As I refer to above Milton tablets mixed with water works as long as your case is not to far gone.

Cheers John
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splinter1804
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« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2016, 00:22:26 »

Hi everyone.

Dan – It’s  great to see a new face joining in our discussions, so please don’t make it a “one off” as we’d like to see you and many more regulars posting to help build this forum back up to what it once was. How about some info on what you grow and perhaps a few pictures so we can get to know you better?

Are you the same Dan from the “sunshine state” who previously posted here and/or on the old “Garden Web Bromeliad Forums”? If so, welcome back; if not, welcome anyway it’s good to have new people to communicate with.

I’ve only been growing seed a short time compared to other growers on this forum, but I’ve found I have the best success when I use Coco-Peat (without added fertilizer) which is available in small and large compressed bricks. Firstly I re-hydrate it, squeeze out excess water and half fill take-away plastic food containers which I microwave on high for five minutes to kill any bugs it may contain.

I grow mostly Neoregelias and if using my own seed, always sow with “green seed” squeezed straight from the capsule onto the Coco-Peat and then sealing the container. Using this method I can’t remember a single occasion where I have had any contamination from moulds.

I know of growers who swear by fresh sphagnum and get good results with the only problem being that the sphagnum will sometimes overgrow the small brom’s at the plantlet stage and has to be trimmed.
There are many growers who use many different growing mixes and it’s been said there are as many different growing mixes as there are growers, however my view is, that with each extra component you put in the mix you increase the chance of contamination from one of the many different moulds and algae which can harm tiny seedlings

I have found that any trouble I’ve previously had, always came from “dry seed” and because of this, I now always sterilize the seed first with a twenty minute soak in Milton solution both already made up and bought in bottles, or I make it myself by dissolving Milton tablets in the recommended quantity of water. After the seed is sown, I also give the seed and the growing surface of the Coco-Peat a good spraying with the same solution as well as the inside walls and the underside of the container. This seems to control any outbreaks of moulds or algae. If they do begin to appear, I just spray with the same solution  daily for two or three days; the secret I’ve found is to spray as soon as you see evidence of these growths………. ATTACK IMMEDIATELY, OBSERVE AND FOLLOW UP IF REQUIRED.

I have no experience with the fungicide you show in your picture or any others as I have never needed to use anything other than the Milton.

All the best, Nev.

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Kayleen C
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« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2016, 13:22:45 »

I grow mostly Neoregelias and if using my own seed, always sow with “green seed” squeezed straight from the capsule onto the Coco-Peat and then sealing the container. Using this method I can’t remember a single occasion where I have had any contamination from moulds.


I use the same method as Nev but grow in peatmoss and have never had any problems.
I did an experiment with 2 batches of seed. One I did as above and the other I added some Eco88 powder [the powder you get at the bottom of the tub] before microwaving. The seeds with the fertiliser did grow quicker but by the time they were planted out there was no difference.
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