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Author Topic: 2 small disasters  (Read 444 times)
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jaga
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« on: June 24, 2016, 07:53:06 »

How everyone, been back from overseas 3 wks and discovered 2 brom disasters, although putting it in perspective very minor compared to UK situation with exiting UE vote, maybe we will all be trading in bromelaids soon.

Disaster 1- Part of our bromelaid wall has rotted away due to our dwarf date palms smothering them. Cut away the lower frongs yesterday in hunt of our Neo 'punctate yellow' clump but seems all is wiped out.

 Images, different views getting closer with each.

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Disaster 2, I put a number of well developed seedling pots into my small plastic house which is on a auto sprinkler system so they would be watered while we were away. We added slug bait and gave them a insecticide spray. Sadly either the slugs have become emune or the bait is useless as came back to find the following.

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More images to follow soon, I'm in the process of trying to repot what looks like may survive and killing all the slugs I find.

John
« Last Edit: June 24, 2016, 23:33:03 by jaga » Logged
splinter1804
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« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2016, 02:30:03 »

Hi everyone.

John – It seems I’m the reason that led to your discovery of the missing Neo 'punctate yellow' after our discussion about 'Jags Bengal Tiger'. I think many of us strive to have a part of our garden where we like to grow our brom’s and other plants in a manner imitating habitat, and I have found (like you) that if you don’t closely monitor plants regularly, they can easily be engulfed and hidden to their detriment by other larger plants and eventually lost.

Plants on benches and in shade houses are usually viewed on a regular basis which isn’t the case with these garden plants as in many situations it’s a case of “out of sight out of mind”. As they grow with their companion plants subtle changes are occurring all the time and it’s not a case of  here one day and gone the next as their disappearance happens in stages and over time.

As you look through your plants and admire the various colours, you tend not to notice the speed that some of the other companion plants are growing; (in your case it was dwarf date palms and in my case it was tree ferns) and as these plants grow, they initially rob the brom’s of light, and progressively the colour is next to go until you end up with brom’s with green foliage blending in with all of the other various shades of green growth. It then gets to the stage where each time you look at them you don’t notice anything out of place until one day you decided to look for a specific plant and that’s when you discover what’s happened; it’s vanished!

I had a nice plant of Aechmea pectinata in among the ferns and other garden plants; it was easily seen when in colour but when the colour faded it’s was just another green plant, and by the time the next round of pups would have been large enough to flower, the old mother had rotted away and the tree ferns had over taken the remaining pups and prevented them from growing, until I finally went there to find “the cupboard was bare”. Fortunately in both our cases these plants can easily be replaced.

What is the “cone is like” object sticking up in pic’s 3 and 4, is it the remains of an inflorescence of Ae.  Bromeliifolia or perhaps the fruit of a Monstera deliciosa?

Also the creeping type small plant with the round shaped leaves in centre left of picture 2; does it have a small pale mauve flower? If it does it’s an invasive pest which will quickly work its way through the whole garden if left alone. I inherited a small piece of this in a pot with a brom I got from a friend once and stood the pot in the garden for a few weeks while I decided where to put it. A piece of this plant must have broken off because about six months later when I was weeding I found it had worked its way through everything and I had to remove all the plants and re-plant them to get rid of it.

As for the pictures of the seedling containers it looks to me that as well as the slug damage, they may have been getting too much water also as they look very similar to some of my seedlings of similar size after a friend was watering them for me when we went away for a holiday once.

What sort of slugs do the damage in your area, are they the smallish light brown ones? Fortunately we don’t get them here but occasionally get the large spotted leopard slugs which will inhabit the area around the seedling containers but for some reason, don’t eat the plants, although the will sometimes lay their eggs between the containers. They looked a bit like cooked Tapioca and when I first saw them I didn’t know what they were but some friends identified them for me.

For anyone who doesn’t know what slugs eggs look like the two pic’s below will illustrate.

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All the best, Nev.

P.S. I may not be on here as much during the next three weeks as my son and family are visiting from Bali and we only see them once a year and like to spend as much time with them as possible. 
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jaga
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« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2016, 04:44:16 »

HI ALL,
Nev some answers to your questions.

1  What is the “cone is like” object sticking up in pic’s 3 and 4, is it the remains of an inflorescence of Ae.  Bromeliifolia or perhaps the fruit of a Monstera deliciosa?

Your later good assumption is correct, its Monstera deliciosa, quite an aggressive plant but does give a great tropical look and is very hardy. Just got to remember to cut it back more often.

2 Also the creeping type small plant with the round shaped leaves in centre left of picture 2; does it have a small pale mauve flower? If it does it’s an invasive pest which will quickly work its way through the whole garden if left alone. I inherited a small piece of this in a pot with a brom I got from a friend once and stood the pot in the garden for a few weeks while I decided where to put it. A piece of this plant must have broken off because about six months later when I was weeding I found it had worked its way through everything and I had to remove all the plants and re-plant them to get rid of it.

Your correct here Nev, terrible to get rid of. Short of starting the whole garden wall over can only touch poison it during the dry months,this sets it back but haven't found any thing that kills it from the weed killer range. This time of year just have to keep weeding away at it. Will need to spend a few days on this area once the rain stops to get it back into some sort of shape.

3- Yes I think your are right, trays have got too much moisture as well as soil was very wet in the first batch I salvaged the best of. The slugs are the dreaded small ones and it is possible the saturated soil has dissolved the slug baits enabling the slugs to move in. Also the insecticide has a life span which had probably passed, needs to be resprayed every couple of weeks.

Yes was the hunt for the 'Punctate Yellow' that's set all this off and like you say plants all just merge in in the garden especially winter time here when most of ours loose colour. Its now on my list of things to sort before more broms get swallowed up. May have to remove the dwarf date palm to get the light back.

Great to hear you have family visiting, do they grow any broms in Bali? as has perfect climate with the warmth.

-John
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