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Author Topic: Our Kuching, Malaysia garden  (Read 549 times)
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jaga
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« on: May 26, 2016, 01:31:31 »

Hi all, some images of our garden here in Kuching. Very warm here at the moment as heat wave all over Asia, up to 40. High humidity.
Start with a variegated ananas(pineapple), has been around here many years.

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« Last Edit: May 26, 2016, 01:40:40 by jaga » Logged
Kayleen C
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« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2016, 11:26:21 »

Jaga have you eaten the pineapples? I had a red one that we cut and ate at a Study Group here.
Tasted pretty good
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splinter1804
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« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2016, 22:21:22 »

Hi everyone.

John - There's some great looking pineapple hybrids around with beautiful colours, unfortunately they don't like our winters so I can't grow them down here.

Apart from the fruit though, have you ever looked closely at the inflorescence? They have the most beautiful colours.

All the best, Nev.


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jaga
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« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2016, 09:21:09 »

Hi all some nice images there Nev, never seen one flower as always get eaten first. The one above we show is eatable but is quite sour do will leave it on and hopefully get a PIC of some flowers.
Close up of above, has a stand out red colour to the fruit

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A few other local varieties which are eatable, images taken at market today.

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Last image shows a new type, apparently very nice so got one to try. Its smaller than the normal one.

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-John
« Last Edit: May 27, 2016, 09:46:07 by jaga » Logged
jaga
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« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2016, 02:05:14 »

Here's one reason the broms in the garden have holes in there leaves,

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- John
« Last Edit: May 30, 2016, 02:12:59 by jaga » Logged
splinter1804
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« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2016, 08:05:44 »

Hi everyone.

John - Are those snails in your Malaysian garden or the New Zealand one? Why I ask is I've seen the occasional snails and slugs here but they don't seem to like eating broms. The only time I used to get leaves chewed was by Grasshoppers and that was before I started using Clensel as an insect repellent.

I don't spray the whole plant, just around the rims of the pots and beneath the base when I re-pot and other times if i see any insect pests and I think it's the smell of the citronella in the spray that does it. I find it an excellent product. See: http://www.clensel.com.au/insect-mite-killer/

All the best, Nev.
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jaga
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« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2016, 09:33:21 »

Nev, its Malaysia, here for few more days. Day started with heavy rain cooling temp to 26 but now jumped back to above 35+.
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