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Author Topic: Just a few pictures!  (Read 733 times)
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jaga
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« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2016, 03:26:24 »

Kayleen not quite all imports, NZ into Aust is the exception. Just had some people we know move to Australia with there entire collection.

-John
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splinter1804
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« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2016, 06:28:59 »

Hi everyone.

Kayleen, is this because of that Xylella bacteria I read about?

It seems it’s a serious plant bacteria that affects a large number of common plants species including:
wine and table grapes
citrus
olives
forestry and amenity trees
almonds
cherries
peaches
plums
avocados
blueberries
coffee
pecans
alfalfa.

Xylella is not present in Australia but is of major concern to Australia’s plant industries.  If it gets into Australia it will be practically impossible to eradicate.

This bacterial disease originated in the Americas and has spread to Europe with recent detections in France and Italy. In the Americas it is causing hundreds of millions of dollars in damage.  Costs to California’s grapevines alone amount to $100 million per year.

You can read more about it at:
http://www.agriculture.gov.au/import/goods/plant-products/how-to-import-plants/xylella 

I really sounds like something we can do without, and it will certainly muck up any plans people have about bringing brom’s back from the next World Bromeliad Conference in Houston, Texas USA in June this year.

All the best, Nev.
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2016, 07:08:21 »

Nev you have been doing your homework!

It is strange that after so many decades of importing and exchanging plant material all over the world these bugs still pop up. Are they man-made? Have we created yet another chemical resistant pest? Part of disease and pest management is the rotation of chemicals used, using integrated pest and disease methods, and maintaining physical barriers where possible to prevent chemical resistance.

Nature also always finds a way out and natural mutations can also become resistant and jump from one host plant to a different plant. A few years ago all South African nurseries Impatiens plants were ruined by downy mildew. We still do not have the variety back in the country and our gardens are a lot duller than before.

Conrad

 
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2016, 14:05:50 »

Yes Nev that is the reason.

That is interesting John. We were told a total ban. I think this has only been in since the beginning of the year so was wondering when your friends moved here.
Does NZ  import from overseas or have they stopped all imports too.
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« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2016, 21:15:16 »

Very recent Kayleen, Late Feb2016, about 4000 broms in quarantine in north Sydney. Also know of other ozz sellers still coming to buy here.

John.
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splinter1804
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« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2016, 22:10:34 »

Hi everyone.

I read somewhere that these new rules were intended to be only temporary until things about the disease were better understood and new controls put in place. However we all know that temporary things always tend to become permanent don’t we?

A disturbing feature of these new rules can be seen in “Changes to import requirements” (No2.  In the document above).

This says:
Material that does not meet the above requirements may be held and tested in an approved post entry quarantine facility for 12 months or nursery stock material may be hot water treated, followed by standard post entry quarantine screening arrangements.

There was recently a picture of a shipment of plants recently posted on Face Book which had had been given this “Hot Water Treatment”. Apparently the water temperature required to kill the disease is more than adequate to kill bromeliad plants, and every plant was terribly scalded and I believe all eventually died. Why would you want to risk importing plants from these “High risk countries” with this rule in place?

All the best, Nev.
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2016, 22:08:34 »

Some feedback guys!

This Aechmea...

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according to the breeder was seed collected off "Pink Goddess". The latter is a seedling of chantinii.

http://registry.bsi.org/?genus=AECHMEA&id=448#448

The pup was taken off a very dark looking plant when I pleaded for it. The striking colour I hope will last. Only time will tell.

As for the Tillandsia imports, they have finally arrived. I did try and get my hands on some of my bucket list plants and got T Hildae for a some of money that will have my bank manager choke. ...well he deserves it!

Once they arrive and are mounted I will post pictures.

Conrad
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splinter1804
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« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2016, 23:21:33 »

Hi everyone.

Conrad - It's amazing that a bromeliad like the one in your picture could have come from a seed parent like Ae Pink Goddess. My mind's turning cartwheels trying to work out what the pollen parent could have been, but looking at the recurved leaves, I'd still bet on recurvata being in there somewhere. Were the flowers similar to recurvata, or has it not flowered as yet? When you get pic's of the flowers please post them I'm sure the others (like me) will be very interested in seeing them.

Just a point of interest; if you look closely at the rear leaf (top right), there is the slightest trace of a bit of albo-margination in it. The other interesting quality is the large amount of scurf on the leaves which I think is pretty unusual for this type of plant, so please keep a photographic history of its progress as it will be very interesting to follow.

Thanks for chasing up the history for us.

All the best, Nev.
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #23 on: April 21, 2016, 21:22:00 »

Nev, This is still a very young pup. When I have a chance I will take a side view photo.  The rest of the grex of plants were all very chantinii like plants, some pale and some dark, What attracted me to this one was the teeth. Those lovely spines! Cant wait for it to flower someday and will definitely share those images.

Best wishes,

Conrad

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