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Author Topic: Just found this!  (Read 596 times)
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jaga
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« on: March 19, 2016, 08:01:28 »

Hi all, Was just putting away some seedlings in my small plastic house when I noticed this.
A pot of Vriesea ospinea var gruberi x sunset seedlings
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A closer look
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Extracted and potted
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So in this case has the variegation in vriesea sunset created this I'm wondering?

John
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splinter1804
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2016, 22:45:52 »

Hi everyone.

John - First up, what Vr. Sunset did you use? Judging by the appearance of the variegation I'd ask was it Vr. 'Kent's Sunset'?

Just for those who don't know, many of us have grown a beautiful variegated small/medium size plant called Vr. 'Sunset' for many years and it wasn't until I looked it up on the BCR a while back I was surprised I couldn't find it listed. What had happened as has with several other plant names, it appears it was duplicated with plants from two different breeders bearing the same name of 'Sunset'. To overcome any confusion, the names were amended with the addition of the breeder's name.

In the case of the variegated one we commonly grow which was bred by J. Kent from Vr. sucrei x Vr. splendens v. formosa, it is now known as Vr. 'Kent's Sunset'. See: http://registry.bsi.org/?genus=VRIESEA&id=9147#9147

The other one is called 'Arden's Sunset' and was bred by J. Arden from Vr. (saundersii x bituminosa) x platynema v. variegata the entry on the BCR is at http://registry.bsi.org/?genus=VRIESEA&id=9146#9146 but unfortunately there is scant information with no picture or written description.

This begs the question of how could it be registered without this information? Have you or anyone else on this forum seen Vr. 'Arden's Sunset' and if so perhaps you could share a description or a picture with the rest of us.

To get back to your cross - If you did use Vr. 'Kent's Sunset', it would appear that it's the transmitter even though its variegation doesn't doesn't include much in the way of thin lining which breeders say are necessary to make a transmitter.

Now for the yellow colouring, and this is just my theory; I would say it's come from the Vr. ospinea var gruberi parent as it has colours from the yellow/brown part of the colour spectrum whereas Vr. 'Ken't Sunset' has colours from the other end of the spectrum; what are your views, and those of anyone else reading this?

All the best, Nev.

Vr. ospinae var. gruberii

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Vr. 'Kent's Sunset'

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Kayleen C
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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2016, 02:17:40 »

John did you plant any of the plain yellow to see what they develop into?
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splinter1804
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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2016, 02:49:31 »

Hi everyone.

Kayleen - I'm glad one of us is awake; I meant to ask that same question as yellow is my favourite colour in Neo's and they're a bit scarce down here.

All the best, Nev.
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jaga
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« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2016, 04:18:36 »

Hi everyone, Nev thanks for clarrifing the Info on 'sunset' as was not aware about that. So to confirm the pollen parent used was Kent's sunset. Plant used has died but here's some of the off spring.
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As can seen some of the pups do demonstrate reasonably fine variegation.
I have rechecked all approx 500 seedlings and appears to be the only one.

John
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jaga
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« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2016, 04:42:11 »

I wasn't aware the 2 of you were so keen on yellow broms!, the following images show the ones potted to date from the 6 pots of seedlings I grew, there maybe some cream / yellow among them, will have to see how they develop.
1
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3
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6
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I think most have been influenced by the red in ' Kent's Sunset'

John.
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2016, 18:05:52 »

My apologies for a late start on this find. Great John, can't wait for it to mature a bit and give its real colour!

PS seedlings from seed you sent are doing fine here too.

Conrad
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splinter1804
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« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2016, 21:02:09 »

Hi everyone.

John - That's great colour and markings in the picture in your first post; it certainly says who "Dad" was.
 
In your second lot of pic's, although Pic's 3 and 6 do show the colour influence of the 'Kent's Sunset' I can also see hints of the Ospinae var. gruberi markings in the plants in Pic's 1, 4 and 5 albeit a bit washed out.

It does though appear that the colour influence from the Kent's Sunset is stronger than the Ospinae var. gruberi.

Conrad - Where on earth have you been for so long? I'd just about given up on you. As a penalty it's going to cost you one of your best recipes (just for the three of us of course) Ha! Ha! says he while on the WWW.

It' good to see you back again anyway, and I hope work doesn't continue to keep you away for so long as we do look forward to your input.

Did you get the seed?

All the best, Nev.
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2016, 17:36:40 »

Hi All,

my humblest of apologies for the intermittent attendance on the forum. I have been moved from my previous shop position, which was in the back kitchen producing meals, to a larger shop where I am now cooking in front of the customers in an island producing gourmet meals. It is far more busier with almost 8 - 9 straight hours of cooking. Needless to say that when I get home I crash onto my bed and disappear!

Nev, I have received seed from John last year sometime ( thanks John!) . Did you send any?

I have just bought a inverter welding machine as I need to construct a seed house for my Tillies  and other brom seed. My next mission is to learn how to weld. As I bought a real cheep welder - I will learn on this one and make all the mistakes possible, then buy a reasonable one later to work with. The wooden poles planted into the soil here is not a good idea as the termites climb into them with gusto even if they are treated.

I will post some photos soon as the rain stops. For a country in drought we have had floods and torrential rain for weeks on end...well maybe not weeks, but it feels that way!


Look forward to seeing more discoveries John and get some ideas from Nev & Kayleen.

John, my long hours of work has made me not walk through my garden as much, so every time that I do now, I am amazed at how much some of the seedlings have grown. Those 2 cm plants planted out in August last year need to be planted into the grown and are almost 10 cm high now. Others even bigger. There is the old saying, " A watched pot never boils" I can also say " A closely watched seedling grows very slowly".

Best wishes,

Conrad
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splinter1804
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2016, 21:59:47 »

Hi everyone.

Conrad - It's good to hear your cheffing is going up in the world, it's just a pity we're not there to sample some of your skills.

I did send seed, not long after we were discussing them on a thread on this forum so I don't know what happened to them, maybe I addressed them incorrectly. Anyway not to worry, I'll send some more.

I have to agree with you about plants appearing to grow more quickly when they aren't watched. I find that even if I haven't been down among the plants for a few days or a week, when I next check them, there's heaps of progress and always something new and interesting to see.

Anyway, I wish you well in your new business venture and hopefully you'll become more regular on here again once things settle down and get back to normal.

All the best, Nev.

 
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2016, 11:20:28 »

Good to see you back Conrad.
Must agree they do grow quicker if not watched. It is a nice surprise when you find them especially a flower popping up.

John there are not a lot of broms around that are yellow. Mainly minis. Agree with what Nev has said about your seedlings. It will be interesting to see what developes.

Conrad my hubby is a welder so all my shade houses are steel. He is hopeless with a piece of wood. [His words]
You will be okay and even a cheap welder will do the job.

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chefofthebush
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« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2016, 18:59:52 »

Thanks for the encouragement Kayleen. I have done several hours of youtube learning....does that count as learning? But there are a lot of information there that is very useful. I will post photos of the process once I get started!

Nev email on its way!

Have Fun.

Conrad
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