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Author Topic: Very much underrated bromeliads that should be in more collections  (Read 2428 times)
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splinter1804
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« on: February 12, 2016, 19:26:41 »

What I'm talking about here is the genus Nidularium.

Fortunately where I live, I can grow these and my other brom's in the garden or shade house and don't have the constraints of requiring a heated glass house or having to move plants inside during winter, so anyone contemplating growing these plants needs to consider their own climatic conditions which may be very different to mine and adapt accordingly.

Nidulariums are grown by a few growers here in my area of south eastern Australia, but nowhere near as many as other commonly grown genera such as Neoregelias, Aechmeas, Guzmanias, Vrieseas and Billbergias.

They are an easy to grow plant and will grow in pots, mounted on trees or simply planted in the garden under similar conditions for those plants mentioned above, but the big plus is that they will also grow and flower when grown in low light conditions that other plants find unacceptable e.g. I have some growing among ferns in a low light environment and still they flower.

Probably the best known and the easiest of the lot to grow is the species Nid. innocentii which will quickly grow into a nice clump when planted in the garden and it produces a nice inflorescence with small white flowers supported by deep red bracts which stay in colour for many months.

There are several different species and hybrids available some of which are shown below........... Give them a try, you won't be disappointed.

All the best, Nev.

Nidularium campos-portoi
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Nidularium innocentii
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Nidularium innocentii var. lineatum
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Nidularium Leprosa
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Nidularium 'Litmus'
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Nidularium 'Miranda'
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Nidularium 'Nana'
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Nidularium 'Orange Bract'
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Nidularium 'Reby Lee'
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All the best, Nev.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2016, 19:32:38 by splinter1804 » Logged
Kayleen C
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« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2016, 11:58:09 »

I have a good collection of them Nev. As you said one of the benefits is they grow well in low light.
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« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2016, 18:27:57 »

Nice collection Nev!

I am only 2 down on your list. I have both Nidularium campos-portoi and Nidularium innocentii var. lineatum. I also have Innocentia and Leprosa as well as several other species.

I will keep up the hunt!

Best wishes,

Conrad
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splinter1804
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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2016, 21:21:34 »

Hi everyone.

It's good to see a couple of you on here are also growing these great plants. How about posting a few pic's so we can compare and probably ID some of my NOIDS?

I'm adding some more (Not very good pictures)  firstly a couple that are named, as well as some NOIDS I would like to have identified if anyone knows what they are.

Nid.'Madonna'
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Nid rubens
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Nid. Innocentii Purpurea This plant came with this name but I can't find it listed anywhere. It looks similar to Nid. 'Ruby Lee' with the underside of the leaves very dark purple, much darker than shown in this poor quality picture.
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'Ruby Ryde'
I bought this one as Nid. 'Ruby Ryde' but it turns out it is a bi-generic and called xNiduregelia 'Ruby Ryde' However no parents or other information is listed. Does anyone know anymore about this plant?
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Nid. 'Orange Bract' x leprosa - I don't know much about this plant except it came to me from a grower in Victoria who inherited it unknowingly. When he bought his house it had a small shade house with a few ferns and brom's including this one. The owner shared a picture on one of the forums and that's how I managed to swap a pup from it. Although the owner said it grows just as well as his other Nidulariums, it is painfully slow to grow and flower for me and is one of those plants that never seems to multiply and just grows one pup to replace the dying mother plant.
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The following are pictures of NOIDS which have found their way into my collection over the last few years and if anyone can help with an ID, please speak up.

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All the best, Nev.
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jaga
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2016, 03:02:50 »

Nev we haven't collected many and most we have are plants others wanted us to have. Strange in a way as they are well suited to the shade parts of the garden.
So here's various images of ours, please excuse the spider webs + leaves etc
Nid 'Raro', just about to flower.
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Nid.'Mirada'
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Various around the garden.
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Cheers John
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splinter1804
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« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2016, 07:40:13 »

Hi Everyone.

John – Now that you mention Nidularium ‘RaRu’ I remembered that I swapped a pup of this with a lady in Queensland a while back so it looks like a trip tomorrow into the jungle to try and locate it.

Your mention of Nid ‘Miranda’ is very timely as I know well the old lady and gentleman who got this as a small seedling and spent some ten to twelve years stabilizing it into the plant we have today.

I speak of course of Nina and Jarka Rehak two very good friends of mine and well known and very knowledgeable members of our society who have passed on enormous amounts of knowledge to us all as we came up through the ranks. Nina is an international judge and has a magnificent collection of mainly species and good quality hybrids of many different genera.

She doesn’t agree with the history as told in the BCR and consequently told the whole story of where it all started and published it in the July 2009 Illawarra bromeliad Society News Link. It will be of interest to you also John that she tells of how it found its way to New Zealand originally.

Read all about it at : http://www.bromeliad.org.au/news/Ill0709.htm

All the best, Nev.
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« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2016, 09:01:09 »

Nev article very interesting!, re 'Mirada', I will have to quiz Peter Waters on this. I'm thinking that those first 5 pups would not have been stable and not what we have now. My plant came as a pup via somebody we knew that brought out one of The original new Zealand collectors complete collection including all there planted garden areas, some 20 trailor loads. Can't say just he first got the plant.
And yes its quite different from the normal as it takes full sun and very high light.
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2016, 11:15:39 »

I have just taken pups off mine today so will grab some pics tomorrow.
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splinter1804
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« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2016, 19:25:32 »

Hi everyone.

John - It will be interesting to see what you find out about the New Zealand history of Miranda.

Kayleen - I'm looking forward to seeing some of your pictures. It seems this thread is picking up a bit of speed and dragging out some interesting facts along the way, dare I say it's getting back to how the old forums used to be, a "knowledge sharing vehicle".

All the best, Nev.
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« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2016, 22:45:18 »

Hi all, Nev Is it possible for you to take a few close up images of you Nid.Miranda leaves to compare to our plant below. Ours does have quite a bit of variation between each leave of the variegations, although all the variegation is quite wide.

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John.
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2016, 12:06:55 »

Litmus
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Leprosa x ferrugineum
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Edumondi lindenii
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Compos portoi
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Ruby lee
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Kautskyanum
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Nat deleon
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Innocentii var
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Leprosa
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Rutlans var
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Regeloides
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Angustifolium
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Chantrieri
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Nat peleor
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Francois Spae
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I have a few others so will post tomorrow.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2016, 02:44:44 by Kayleen C » Logged

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splinter1804
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« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2016, 20:15:37 »

Hi everyone.

Kayleen - Wow! That's a great collection and I'll study them in more detail after I send the pic's which John requested yesterday.

I posted them yesterday afternoon after I took them and this morning they aren't there, for some reason they've just vanished.

John - Take 2 - These were posted yesterday afternoon just after I took them and for some reason they just vanished. I didn't check after I posted them so maybe Kayleen and I posted at the same time and that has something to do with it, who knows?

Anyway here they are again.

Al the best, Nev.

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Kayleen C
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« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2016, 00:31:11 »

I like your Nid Miranda Nev.
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splinter1804
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« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2016, 02:54:19 »

Hi again - Well it looks like the pic's have attached OK this time, I don't know what it is with me and computers, they just don't like me for some reason. Maybe one day when I come into a lot of money I'll buy a new one, but until then I just have to contend myself with my old "hand me down".

Kayleen – You start your selection off with what I think is one of the most interesting bromeliads around and certainly the most interesting Nidularium.

For anyone who doesn’t know this Nidularium, when it comes into flower, the colour of the bracts is red and as it ages over several months the colour progressively changes to an attractive pale mauve/blue. (I’ve attached pic’s to show what I mean)

I’m not familiar with Leprosa x ferrugigeum; is this one of your own hybrids?

It’s interesting you show a pic of Edumondi lindenii which is a separate genus which at first sight looks like a Nidularium, in fact when I got my first plant the man I got it off said it was a Nidularium but he didn’t know the name and I just accepted it as a Nidularium NOID without checking any further. I grew it for several years before I found that it was in fact an Edmundoa. The one I have was ID’d as Edmundoa lindenii var. rosea and I have pictures of it on the FCBS Photo Index.

I have the same one as yours as well, which is Edmundoa lindenii I grew form seed, and the difference between the two is that this has white bracts and the rosea has pink. Also the inflorescence on the straight lindenii doesn’t protrude much above the central cup whereas with the rosea form, it stands well clear of the central cup.

I also have a third form which is variegated and although there are some variegated forms called Edmundoa 'Alvim Seidel' (the pick of the genus in my opinion), I don’t think mine is one, as the variegations aren’t as clearly defined.

Your next plant which I too grew for many years under the name of compos-portoi until I found the FCBS and it told me it should be called campos-portoi. It is a very attractive little plant with its bright orange leaf marking and looks great in a basket with multiple plants.

Nid. Ruby Lee is the most colourful of all the Nidulariums I’ve seen and doesn’t need very high light to get that wonderful colour. Always popular and one for every collection.

Nid. Kautskyanum is one I’ve never seen or heard of before. I don’t know whether it’s a species or a hybrid as I can’t find I listed on the FCBS Index.

I “Googled” the name “Nid. Kautskyanum“ and only came up with five hits and from these I find that Nidularium kautskyanum is endemic to Brazil and is a species discovered by Leme. No doubt Leme’s book about the Nidularium genus will have more info in it so when I’m at the next brom. meeting I’ll look it up and let you know what I find.

Where did you manage to get it from and do you have a pup you’d part with?
The plant you have named as Nat DeLeon is called Nid. ‘Red Queen’. It has also been grown down here for many years under the name of Nat DeLeon, however when Nat DeLeon was questioned about the name he didn’t know of such a Nidularium. It seems if was one of a group of plants imported from USA (Probably from Nat DeLeon) in the early days and the name Nat DeLeon was attached as a reference to where it had come from and over the years it had become known as the name. I think the whole story is on the BCR but I’m unable to access it at the moment so maybe you can look it up. It is a popular Nidularium and well worth growing.

Your next plant shown as Nid innocentii is either Nid. var. innocentii lineatum or Nid. var.innocentii striolatum (I can never tell the difference) It is a desirable plant and the dark red bracs are complimented but the fine variegations.

Nid leprosa is another popular plant and is different to most as it has a lot of spotting; another worthy plant to collect.

I have Nid rutilans but unfortunately not the variegated form, so again if you have a spare pup looking for a home please let me know.

Nid Regeloides is another I don’t have and can’t find on the FCBS index either. Do you have a picture of it in flower?

Nid angustifolium is another Brazilian species I’ve been after for some time; so again, if you have a spare pup I’d be pleased to hear from you.

Nid Chantrieri is another beautifully coloured Nid. and I think there is an interesting story attached to it as well but as I said I can’t check on the BCR as it seems to be out of order at present.

Nid. Nat peleor is another I don’t know and I can’t find any info. about it. Do you have any further info?

Nid. Francois Spae I don’t have either but I see that it’s from innocentii v. striatum x fulgens

As I said above a very interesting collection and I look forward to seeing some of your other ones.

Now here's Nid. 'Litmus' as it goes through all the various colour changes which makes it such an interesting plant.

All the best, Nev.

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jaga
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« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2016, 05:41:00 »

Hi Nev, thanks for showing your Nid 'Miranda', just wanted to check on the variegation pattern in comparison to mine. Seems very similar but your green leaf edge stands out more I suspect as you have your plant in lower light than mine?.
So the 'plot thickens', as the plant given to Peter Waters according to the article was as follows,

"After the first flowering, we had five pups, all with some stripes. One went to Robert Larnach, another to Peter Waters in New Zealand, and the three remaining pups — and ten years of selective propagation — produced a very stable variegated plant which was registered as Nidularium ‘Miranda’, and named for the suburb of Sydney where we live "

Which means Peter got a pup not yet stable so how has it got to what I now have Im wondering?

cheers John
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