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Author Topic: High UV now here  (Read 1153 times)
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jaga
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« on: December 26, 2015, 03:46:30 »

Hi all , its very high UV now so this year I have made a effort to remove my vriesea creations off our roof today. Plants were getting very stressed with colour washing out so moved in the nick of time. Last year they were left to February with some serious burn damage.
Its also a good chance to give them a annual wash out and see what's worth keeping.

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This ones very close!
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Another only days away
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Have more to shift so better carry on,  cheers Jaga.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2015, 04:03:08 by jaga » Logged
chefofthebush
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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2015, 19:10:05 »

Good idea John & Agatha!

But where did you move them from and what are they under now. Under fiberglass or shade-net?

I am considering suspending shade net from my house gutters to the boundary wall. My Tillies would object! but I am sure I could get away with a 20 - 25% net without harming my Tillies too much.

Conrad
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splinter1804
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2015, 20:23:03 »

Hi everyone - I'm glad to see you posting again Jaga, I thought we'd lost you to Face Book also.

We've been having the most unpredictable weather I've ever seen here, hot summer weather one day  and cool autumn weather the next. My plants in the front garden copped a thrashing in late November with an out of character scorcher. The weather was around 13-17 degrees and unusually cool for that time of year and then out of nowhere comes a couple of days at 37 -39 degrees followed by more days in the 19 - 21 range . It had been forecast so I erected some temporary shade cloth as a precaution but even that didn't help and many plants were badly scorched.

The foliage of the Neo's really copped a pasting but what was unexpected were the Ae blanchetianas which copped it as well; this surprised me as these are grown in the open in tropical Nth Queensland with no problems. I'm beginning to think now that the high temperatures aren't as much the enemy as the sudden variation in temperature and the plants just don't have time to adjust to the sudden change and this is why the damage occurs. Surprisingly the Vrieseas stood up pretty well with just the occasional leaf burns.

What the high out of season temperatures have done though is to stress the plants to the extent that it has forced flowering. I have one Vr. Phillipo-coburgii just producing seeds from a couple of previous flower spikes and it is now producing eight (out of season) more spikes. Another clump of Vriesea in the garden which has only ever produced one or two flower spikes at a time has seven at present and along the rear garden bed there are six large seed grown blanchetianas and they too are showing flower spikes two of which are about six feet high. This all sounds great but they don't look too good with the accompanying burn damage and discoloured foliage.

I guess this is all a sign of more to come with the "climate change" we hear so much about, but it's certainly not something I'm looking forward to.

All the best, Nev.
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jaga
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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2015, 23:56:43 »

Greetings all. Conrad, image below shows space on roof where vriesea s were. Now safely away under the shade cloth just behind.
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Nev you do seem to have more extreme weather there, ours has had a gradual increase in temps and UV but is now extreme. The Neos you see generally can tolerate it as they are mostly the ones with Skotak tiger as one of the parents.
Sorry about not commenting much recently, been busy sorting our guest bathroom, then held family Xmas at our place.

Cheers Jaga.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2015, 00:03:03 by jaga » Logged
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