Bromeliad Forum
February 24, 2018, 17:13:09 *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

News: Change your Profile, Photo etc by clicking on the Profile button above
 
   Home   Help Forum Rules Login Register  
Del.icio.us Digg FURL FaceBook Stumble Upon Reddit SlashDot

Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How many species do you grow ?  (Read 2994 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
pinkbroms
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 169


« Reply #15 on: April 25, 2011, 16:04:44 »

Hi Guys

Michael, I'll see what I can do for you, the plants we have as Wer. 'Mindo' we got as Tillandsia, WC seed, Mindo. When these flowered I identified them as Wer. bassonita, however as this is undescribed and we're not taxonomists we can't put this name on it yet, so Wer. 'Mindo' is what we tagged it as for ref. only. I don't know if this is the same plant Pete is refering to as Wer. 'Mindo', ours looks nothing like Wer. m-l.

I'll send you and Pete photo's tomorrow for confirmation.

PB
Logged
pedro
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Posts: 580



WWW
« Reply #16 on: April 26, 2011, 00:51:45 »

Hi PB, sounds like a different plant. Post a pic when time. It's from Fortuna! Pedro
Logged
Mitche
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Other Plants I Grow: Cacti, Succulents, Palms, Cycads
Hobbies: Tennis
Posts: 222


« Reply #17 on: April 26, 2011, 13:04:59 »

The balance of those Costa Rican cloud forest photos as promised. However like Pedro I'm 60/40 in favour of the plants pictured being Guzmanias over Werauhias. What do the other forum experts think??
Mitche
You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login
Logged
No ads for the duration of the month!!!

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

bromadorer
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Australia Australia

Hobbies: gardening
Posts: 135



« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2011, 08:56:44 »

Good discussion and pics.
I have 2 x W. sanguinolenta. One small seedling plant struggled through last winter but has grown well this summer. I kept it dry and warm in the cold months. The other was purchased as a large plant and I kept it very dry and in morning sun, protected from cold southerly winds through winter. It did get a bit of damage to the leaves, but has almost outgrown it this season. I hope to get them through this winter, although the signs are there for a very wet one! I am moving alot of plants under cover this winter to get them out of the rain.
I also have some seedling W. kupperianas, but am going to baby them inside until spring. John Catlan has a lovely one up there in brisbane.
BA
Logged
Springer99
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 50



WWW
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2011, 03:26:07 »

Hi everyone,
I am only new here, and I only have one Werauhia, it's a sanguinolenta rubra... that's what the tag says.  (I'm only new to broms)
It is so nice and big quite amazing.  I love the pics you have all put up and I had to agree whole heartedly with Lisa's THUD!!  Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked LOL what an awesome photo.  I saw one in the fcbs website that I drooled all over, but then read up and decided it was best to NOT hold my breath of getting one.  It was 'Edna Shiigi'. the only seedling out of 1500 to come out like it.  I really hope they managed to reproduce it and keep it going.  Stunning.
I must say, being new and all, I had not heard of Werauhia and i have no idea how to pronounce it, but I would like to learn more about them.  Are there many species grown in Aus?  I'm up north in the tropics and just have mine growing in a fairly shady area, definitely gets no mid day sun, just maybe a bit of late afternoon sun on it. Here is a pic of mine, not a real great photo but you'll get the idea. Mitche your photos are awesome!!
Tash



You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login
« Last Edit: July 27, 2011, 03:30:28 by Springer99 » Logged
Bruce
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Other Plants I Grow: Heliconia Gingers Marantaceae
Posts: 204



« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2011, 09:26:09 »

Hi Tash

I grow another couple of sp. of Werauhia apart from sanguninolenta in Oz. W. kupperiana and W. lutheri.
I also used to have W. gigantea but a plain green leafed sp. soon lost its appeal.
These are baby W. lutheri in an old citrus plantation in Panama
You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

W. lutheri getting closer to maturity a big silvery plant


You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

W. kupperiana that had fallen out of the canopy also in Panama


You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login
Logged
aroideana
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Other Plants I Grow: Aroids Palms Cycads
Hobbies: Extreme cuisine , Durian
Posts: 325



« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2011, 14:37:55 »

Marvelous Bruce , another sp. in Aus .. and silver Grin Grin Grin
I now have lots of self sown sanguinolenta seedlings on trees in my front yard .
You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login
Logged
sdandy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
United States United States

Other Plants I Grow: Awesome stuff.
Posts: 1247



WWW
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2011, 16:53:16 »

Oh-uh Tash!!  Looks like there is still lots of room to squeeze in a lot more broms around that nice looking Werauhia!  Grin  I pronounce it: wah-RAUH-ee-a or wuh-RAUH-ee-a (depending on how you read wah/wuh)...sorry, don't know how to write out that sound (Rauh).  Rauh rhymes with 'wow'.  Anyone pronounce it with the German 'W'?

The genus was named for the German botanist, Werner Rauh.  He already had a genus of bulb-like plants named after him (Rauhia), and two genera (plural of genus) can't share the same name even in different families since the genus is the first part of the 'scientific name' or binomic name.  And it would be cumbersome to have a third level in the name (family or order which are the next smallest divisions above genus) to be more clear.  That is why we have the genus Neoregelia...originally they named it Regelia, but there was already a genus with that name!  But in this case they added the 'We' in front from his first name.  Either the BSI or FCBS website has a good list of what the genera where named for (can't seem to find it quickly).  Can you tell I love random trivia?
-andy
Logged

Springer99
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 50



WWW
« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2011, 23:38:51 »

Hi everyone, great photos!!  Bruce as I was looking at yours I was thinking, how on earth does that stay up a tree, then the next one.... you said that one had fallen from the canopy...  I can see why, they are so big.  I can not imagine mine up a tree but then I have heard of people having Aechmea blanchetiana's  up trees, so anything is possible Wink 
Arroideana, how big will those ones grow that are up your trees?  I am trying my hand at growing seeds, but I don't have any Werauhia ones going, so it's nice to see yours.  I have lots of little Neos sprouting, a tray of alcantareas but none of my vriesea ones are showing signs of life Sad What do Werauhia seeds look like?  They would be feathery like the alcantareas I imagine?Huh
Yup Andy, I have loads of space still, lol, I have only been collecting broms since after Christmas so I have a long long longggg way to go Wink  Thanks so much for the pronounciation I think I have it sorted now, wuh-row(is in wow but with a r)-ee-a. (is that close?)  Man why do they have to make the makes so hard, lol, it's all Werner's fault on this one by the sounds, lol.  I have written it down in the notebook, still trying to get my tongue around all the broms genera.
Would you say that mine is about full size?  I'm not sure of the age of it, I actually brought it from Bunnings of all places, I happened to see it and just had to have it, lol.  Had never heard of a Werauhia or seen one, but you know what this bromillitus is like.....it found it's way home with me Wink
Tash
Logged
sdandy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
United States United States

Other Plants I Grow: Awesome stuff.
Posts: 1247



WWW
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2011, 20:19:33 »

Yup, looks like you have it.  And as no one else has jumped in on any other way to say it, we can take the silence as agreement.
-andy
Logged

Springer99
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 50



WWW
« Reply #25 on: July 29, 2011, 13:53:02 »

wuh row ee a..... I'm getting it.  LOL
Ok another question... told you I am full of them, lol. I just read that Werauhia's sanguinolenta don't pup!  Is that true?  so how do they replace them selves?  I also saw a post where a 2 year old seedling was still quite small, so if mine came from a seed, it must be quite old as it's really big.  Is seed the only way of reproducing them? 
Hmmmm interesting all this stuff Smiley
Tash
Logged
No ads for the duration of the month!!!

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

aroideana
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Other Plants I Grow: Aroids Palms Cycads
Hobbies: Extreme cuisine , Durian
Posts: 325



« Reply #26 on: July 30, 2011, 01:28:42 »

Pup just comes up beside old flower spike , and plant continues to grow . Eventually getting a bit of a trunk . These can be slow esp. in cooler places . When small some have lil' hair pups and can be multiplied this way .
Logged
Bruce
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Other Plants I Grow: Heliconia Gingers Marantaceae
Posts: 204



« Reply #27 on: July 30, 2011, 05:56:52 »

Tash

If you got yours from Bunnings it is probably one of my babies. Fertiliser makes them grow and the more you give them the quicker they grow. In the wild they will take years and years to get to maturity. I've seen them with trunks as they pup next to the flower spike and just continue to keep growing from generation to generation in the same spot. See image one with a trunk in the bush in Panama. Seed is pretty much exactly the same as Vriesea seed.
You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

Also gives me an excuse to post W. Edna Shigii at David's place in Hilo. Also in shot is David, me with hair, 8 years ago and also Mark Collins who sadly passed away this year. Mark was an amazing plant collector in Heliconia and Gingers

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login
Logged
jaga
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 714



« Reply #28 on: July 30, 2011, 08:39:17 »

Hi all, very interesting post, magical pics ,so Mitch the W. plants you are growing, any idea's on what altertude the seed parents came from ??, as im lucky enough to trail one of each (thanks very much Mitch) im hoping the higher the better of course although I suspect our 2-4 degree nights of recent times wont cut it.
Logged
Premium Advert
Springer99
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 50



WWW
« Reply #29 on: July 30, 2011, 10:22:27 »

Oh wow Bruce, so my big beauty who is the centre or attention in that little garden is one of your babies!  How cool, well may I say you do a beautiful job on them, cause it's really nice.  Thanks Bruce and aroideana for explaining about the pups. Wow that is so amazing about the pup and the trunk, really cool.  So it would be as if the plant never dies, just keeps going and keeps flowering except it's the new offset each time. You said in the wild, do they do that in a pot as well?  how old can they get?  see questions questions questions, I can't help myself.  Is there a certain fertiliser you recommend above the others and how often do you feed yours?  How long do they take to get to as big as mine? 
so seeds are like Vriesea seeds, cool.  I would love to try and grow some of them from seed, imagine getting that 1 in 1500 result and getting a W. Edna Shigii or something close to that, I can't believe you have seen that with your own two eyes!!!  i'm so jealous, lol.  That is the one I commented on in my first post,that i had seen it in the fcbs photos and just drooled all over it, that is awesome!  My question is, that photo was 8 years ago, did ...or has W. Edna Shigii been reproduced in some way?  Did it seed and was the seed grown?  what happened?  so curious about that.
thanks so much, I LOVED the photos, just amazing...I might have to get a couple more if I see them again, they sound like such amazing broms.
How old is your oldest one? 
Tash
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP © Copyright Bromeliad & Airplant Forum | Hosted By GTS Designs
Powered by SMF 1.1.10 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC | Sitemap
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!