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Author Topic: How many species do you grow ?  (Read 2993 times)
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aroideana
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« on: November 16, 2010, 10:36:13 »


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 gigantea , pic taken just a few weeks ago , this one has flowered twice and given heaps of seeds . A bit tropical , but does grow around Brisbane .


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Everyone knows kupperiana , so slow as a seedling , I have given up , some here for 5 years done nothing !!

sanguinolenta , I call this form discolour as it is so different to the red form .
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Tiny little marnier-lapostollei , got seed setting on this one again .

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A few more later ..
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aroideana
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« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2011, 07:04:17 »


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vittata clump doing well for me , it gets a few hair pups that root well . Have had seed a few times , that I never seem to get around to sowing  Huh Roll Eyes
This seems to be a variable sp. as some pictures seen online look a lot different .

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paul_t23
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« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2011, 11:25:53 »

Hi Michael,

I only have kupperiana at this stage - not sure how the others would do down here in Sydney but I'd be interested to find out.  That kupperiana of your's in the pic has great form, much more filled in than others I've seen, although admittedly I haven't seen many.  Do you think that is a result of particular growing conditions, or does it just seem to be that particular plant?

Cheers, Paul
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aroideana
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« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2011, 11:42:42 »

Funnily enough the plants Peter Sargent got , came from a Sydney grower several years ago . I potted them up in straight quincan , so they grew very slow , maybe that helped the confirmation .
I just repotted one of my seedlings that got squashed under fallen trees in Yasi , it should survive . Many Werauhia spp. seem to be tropical , I know sanguinolenta struggle in Brisbane . But the few other spp. pictured on FCBS like ringens are highland and may do ok , but are they in cultivation here yet ?
I had a hygrometrica I got from John Catlan that struggled for a few years and carked it one very wet season .
Would really like to get a few more .. thus my question ...
Anyone else growing any Werauhia spp. HuhHuhHuhHuhHuhHuh?

got some marnier-lapostollei seeds just harvested ..
any takers ?
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Lisa
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« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2011, 19:37:51 »

The only species I've ever grown or seen here are kupperiana and sanguinolenta. 

I'd love to get my hands on a hygrometrica, and vittata is a new one on me!  Very nice.  If you even get seeds again.........   Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy 
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Brod
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« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2011, 01:20:45 »

Hope your seedling survives ok.
I'm only growing sanguinolenta. It's doing very well here in Brisbane. There are a number of seeding ones around which a are very large. I've managed to grow a few seed.
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pedro
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« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2011, 01:45:32 »

Hi Michael

I used to have a lot of different species that I collected but climatic extremes have wiped out most over the years. I still have 1 surviving hygrometrica (a variable species) as well as the usual ones (mostly low altitude) already mentioned. A new one at small seedling stage is W lutheri which Bruce collected in Panama and grew. They are only tiny though. A lot of species seem to be singles in nature indicating a short life span - flower, seed then die. Really, control climate is needed for most, esp cooling. I had a commercial Bonaire (evaporative cooler) on my glasshouse which died about 10 yrs back right on an Xmas heatwave. Nothing much survived the next 3 weeks before I managed to get a new motor. I reckon I had 20+ species including latissima, vietoris, leucophylla, uxoris, nephrolepis and many others with beautifully banded leaves, all thriving. I'll never get them again - the forests were being eliminated fast and it's not worth the risk. It is expensive catering for these narrow climate plants too.

Cheers, Pedro
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Mitche
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« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2011, 06:13:22 »

Pedro,
I'm trying to grow the usual sanguinolenta and kupperiana here in a colder part of Auckland, however the lower leaves are getting cold spotting and I'm not satisfied with their health. Can you give the cultural requirements and tolerances for these plants from your growing experiences. I'm hoping eventually to do some bigenerics with Alcantarea or Vriesea. Have you tried anything like this?? I notice that David Shiigi didn't get the bonus of hybrid vigour with his registered bigeneric crosses with Vriesea, rather the offspring were more sensitive than either parent.
Mitche
 
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pedro
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« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2011, 06:30:58 »

Hi Mitche

Those 2 are lowland species so very cold intolerant. I haven't worried about hybridising them following the experiences of others. They need winter protection here, under plastic or better still, heated. Hope this helps.

Cheers, Pedro
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Mitche
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« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2011, 10:30:29 »

Pedro, So you were using your Bonaire cooler for high altitude cloud forest Werauhia species only which have quite different temperature needs from sanguinolenta and kupperiana. But, I understood that there are some populations of both kupperiana and sanguinolenta to be found at high altitude also?
In '06 friends were contracted by the Costa Rican government to collect and describe cloud forest flies and they photographed this unnamed Werauhia? there. Can you get me one next time you go Pedro...perhaps one or two others on the forum may also want one too!
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Lisa
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« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2011, 10:40:33 »

*THUD*   Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked
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Mitche
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« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2011, 11:21:31 »

No Lisa, I'm pretty sure it's not Werauhia thud ,but probably W. drool. How'd you like to smack that on the show table at your local brom club! Actually I emailed Chester about this plant and he said that it won't even survive down at the lower altitude of his Costa Rican nursery...I know what I'd do...shift the bloody nursery up the hill. Actually I have one more photo somewhere of another jaw dropping unnamed Werauhia that these friends took.. I'll try and find it.
Mitche
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« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2011, 11:39:12 »

Hi Guys

I can add a couple more that we have,

Werauhia gladioliflora
             viridiflora
             'Mindo'  (unreg) most likely Wer. bassonita

PB
     
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pedro
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« Reply #13 on: April 25, 2011, 11:53:23 »

Mitche, the highest I saw kupperiana was around 1200m at Fortuna in Panama (see recent BSI journal article) so that's the one to get. About 30 hrs should get you there, good beers too. Very even and mild climate though so might suit LOTLWC better. If I get seed I'll send you some.

The mountains in Costa R are generally much higher and the best Werauhia altitudes are around 1500-2000m where it rains most days and the day temp rarely gets over 25, but no kupperiana or sanguinolenta there, basically lowland plants in CR. The higher altitude Werauhias should thrive for you Kiwis. Give them good water and some tlc and they'll be weeds - no flies on them!

Hey Lisa, just about everything looks lined, spotted and/or banded at altitude. Fantastic sight! You'd need to wear steel caps. Could even be a Guzmania though.

I flowered 'Mindo' too Ross - a bit like m-l. Give me the tesselations  any day. I got some different beauties once, ex Colombia the labels said, but the damned gas... Bruce should have an eye feast soon.

Seed is the way to go.

Cheers, Pedro

P.S. I always share my plants around.
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aroideana
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« Reply #14 on: April 25, 2011, 12:58:33 »

Ross & pedro how about sharing some of those different Werauhias ?
I am so close to the mountains here they should survive , and as its cooling down now they might settle in well.
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