Bromeliad Forum
June 27, 2017, 12:30:42 *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

News: Any Admin problems, email me at admin@cliviaforum.co.za
 
   Home   Help Forum Rules Login Register  
Del.icio.us Digg FURL FaceBook Stumble Upon Reddit SlashDot

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Campos do Jordão e Pedra do Baú  (Read 4809 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Reginaldo
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Brazil Brazil

Other Plants I Grow: orchids, cacti
Posts: 58



« on: January 04, 2015, 19:57:13 »

Happy New Year to everyone!
 Last week I was in Campos do Jordao and Pedra do Baú and took some pictures of bromeliads (altitude 1600-2000 m). That region is an APA (Area of Environmental Protection).

At an altitude of 1600m (Atlantic Rainforest)
You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

With Sinningia douglasii:
You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

It is common the presence of Araucaria angustifólia:

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login


In Pedra do Baú to 2000 m of altitude:

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

Zygopetalum (orchid)
You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

Oncidium (orchid)
You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login
Logged
splinter1804
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Hobbies: I belong to the Illawarra Bromeliad Society as well as the Illawarra Light Railway Museum Society and we restore and operate old 2' gauge steam and diesel locomotives and associated rolling stock
Posts: 1383



« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2015, 21:00:06 »

Hi Reginaldo - Happy New Year to you and your family also, as well as any other members who may be looking in, although I don't know if there's many as this site has been very quiet lately.

I really love to look at habitat pictures and these are no exception as they illustrate just how these wonderful plants grow in nature and you've captured the scenery magnificently.

Do you know what the plant is in Pic's 5 and 6, and what about picture 7, is that Vr. Phillipo-cobergii ?

I recognised the Zygopetalum from my orchid growing days but don't recognise the scarlet flowers in the previous picture; are these plants Pitcairnias of some sort? Also, the picture of the Oncidium in the second last picture appears to be growing on the ground, yet I was always under the impression they only grew on trees and there doesn't appear to be a nearby tree where it may have fallen from.

And the formations of the giant ancient monoliths in pictures 12 and 15 look so majestic as they overlook and dwarf the forest below them.

I've really enjoyed your pic's Reginaldo, please keep them coming, they're fantastic.

All the best, Nev.
 

Logged
Premium Advert
Kayleen C
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Australia Australia

Other Plants I Grow: Natives, tropicals
Posts: 454



« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2015, 10:22:57 »

Happy New Year Reginaldo.
It is good to see plants in their natural habitat as so much is being destroyed.
Logged

Save water, shower with a friend.
No ads for the duration of the month!!!

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

Reginaldo
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Brazil Brazil

Other Plants I Grow: orchids, cacti
Posts: 58



« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2015, 21:01:36 »

Hi Nev,

The bromeliad of red flowers really is a Pitcairnia, probably one of several varieties of P. flammea.
I think in that region does not occur Vr. Philippo-coburgii because not seen bromeliads with the typical inflorescence (even dry) of this species.
One of the photos is probably Vr. bituminosa.
In the first picture in the lower right corner there is a Vriesea with dry inflorescence, think it might be Vr. lubbersii.
Indeed the vast majority of species of Oncidium are epiphytic, but a few species are rupicolous.
At the top of the stone I photographed using the camera zoom, because the place is slippery and dangerous
Logged
jaga
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 713



« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2015, 06:56:21 »

Hi Reginaldo - Happy New Year back at you!! see you have started off this year with some really wonderful habitat images that most of us can only dream of ever seeing. I to wondered about image 7 ?, seems very small in leaf length to be Vr. bituminosa ? this plant here is over 900mm in dia, I guessing its due to being in a tree rather than good soil in a pot. This has given me a idea-will see if I have a spare one here to try in a tree. I am enjoying your posts so keep them coming.
Logged
Reginaldo
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Brazil Brazil

Other Plants I Grow: orchids, cacti
Posts: 58



« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2015, 15:27:52 »

Hi Jaga, I think that Vr. bituminosa of photo is still young, but really when cultured are larger than in nature. I saw some specimens with dry inflorescence and were not very large.
I am attaching a picture of another bromeliad with dry inflorescence whose identity is unknown to me.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login
Logged
jaga
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 713



« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2015, 09:19:49 »

Hi all thought might as well add in our garden jungle search for my lost Vr bituminosa, this is one of my original vriesea planted and did not quite realize just how over grown this part of the garden has got or just how bad the mosquito's were!. This first image shows getting close to the plant

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

target plant is in site

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

lucky for me the plant is a tough survivor and it had multiplied into three

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

close up for Reginaldo before I remove one to use on a tree. Will be getting good nutrients from the ground and will be interesting to see how it fears in a tree.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

Tree image to follow soon, cheers Jaga
Logged
Reginaldo
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Brazil Brazil

Other Plants I Grow: orchids, cacti
Posts: 58



« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2015, 02:27:49 »

Hi Jaga,
I think the Vr bituminosa may go well attached to the tree, if the ambient humidity is adequate. It is a species that acquires a beautiful shape when she have space.
Logged
jaga
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 713



« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2015, 08:49:51 »

Hi all, A image of Vr bituminosa wire mounted in a tree. Selected a spot with plenty of cover which can be thinned once the plant grows a root system and adjusts to this location. The surrounding new tree growth is from pruning the tree and offers side support to stop the plant from moving about at this stage.  I would normally use a pup rather than a more developed plant but this was the smallest of the three, probably bigger than what it should have been but should still do ok.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

Reginaldo, humidity here is that of the tropics at the moment as its summer, about 27 degrees most days , hot and sticky so should give the plant a good start. Have grown Vr philipo coburgii very easily in trees so hope this will be similar only bigger,

Cheers Jaga
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP © Copyright Bromeliad & Airplant Forum | Hosted By GTS Designs
Powered by SMF 1.1.10 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC | Sitemap
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!