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Author Topic: Billbergia Viridiflora  (Read 1744 times)
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378
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« Reply #15 on: November 04, 2014, 04:43:30 »

It does indeed self set seed. I germinated a bunch of seeds in Aug 2013 and have lots of seedlings.
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« Reply #16 on: November 04, 2014, 06:55:02 »

Hi everyone.

Dan - I totally agree with you when you say there is no substitute for the preservation of the natural habitat and the whole gene pool of the species.

The fact is though, we can't guarantee the preservation of these habitats as more and more land is being cleared and raped every day. The only ones who can put a stop to this are the governments of these countries and they seem to be reluctant to do anything which might jeopardize the dollars they are reaping from the mining and timber companies who are doing the clearing of the land.

That's why it's important for brom enthusiasts world wide to do what they can to help preserve the species by multiplying any plants at present still in collections by vegetative and seed propagation. The BSI seed bank and seed banks of other societies are other avenues where species seed is available and which are under utilised, and for people in countries like Australia which are far away from the natural habitat of these "hard to get brom species" and where getting live plants is impossible, seed seems to be the only other option open to aid in the preservation of these species.

Just recently I read where Ae pineliana minuta is now extinct in its natural habitat, and that is an example of one we can do something about as it's quite common in Australian collections as are many others. Even if we can do nothing about the plants still in their natural habitats, let's at least do what we can to preserve those species still in collections and available to enthusiasts.

I'll get down off my soap box now and say:

All the best, Nev.

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« Reply #17 on: November 04, 2014, 09:46:50 »

378, that is great that you have prior experience with this species.

If you would be so kind, do you recall:

(a) did all the flowers self-set seed more or less automatically;

(b) alternativley, did you need to "force" self-pollination;

(c) was there an unusual time of day during which the stigma was receptive?

This information is relevant as I am using about a 1/3 of the flowers for self-set seed, 1/3 for attempted hybrids and a further 1/3 unpollinated for as a control. If it self-sets without any intervention I may need to be wary of whether my hybrids are hybrids at all. Though in most cases I removed the anthers before they became active.

Thanks, I would love to know from someone who has experience with this plant.


Kind regards,
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« Reply #18 on: November 04, 2014, 20:00:38 »

Hi everyone.

378 - Is Billbergia Viridiflora readily available in your area?

Pleased to hear you have lots of seedlings from your own seed to help keep this plant in circulation.

Have you made any Bill. hybrids or bi-generic hybrids with it yet?

All the best, Nev.
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« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2014, 14:45:50 »

It self set seed, but only 3 berries developed, I did nothing to encourage or discourage seed development. No I didn't bother with crossing it, I can't think of anything I'd want to cross it with. I've never seen it available but someone in my bromeliad society had it and gave it to me.
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« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2014, 20:08:51 »

Hi everyone.

Thanks for the feedback 378

all the best, Nev.
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« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2015, 10:13:28 »

For the sake of rounding this off. My experiment was a complete failure - no selfset seed or hybrid pollination! may be the clone i suppose.
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« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2015, 21:40:16 »

Hi everyone.

Dan -  Don't be too disappointed, what you did is not a failure if you learned something from it. There are many things that may have contributed to the pollen not taking. It may have been the wrong time of the day or simply incompatible parents; it doesn't mean that all the other plants you could use will give the same disappointing results. One other thing, and I know it's a long shot coming from someone with no experience in this area, but maybe because this is such an unusual plant, pollination may need to be performed at night.

My suggestion is to keep a record of the plants you tried to use and next time, use different ones. Also don't forget you can freeze pollen for future use as well.

It's good to see you posting again so don't let it end here; become a  regular and help swell the ranks of the few of us that are still posting and trying to keep these conversations going. 

All the best, Nev.
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« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2015, 02:28:19 »

Dan, I have a packet of viridiflora seeds left. Want me to send them almost half way around the world to you? Private message me an address if you do.
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“If I could remember the names of all these particles, I'd be a botanist”, Enrico Fermi
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