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Author Topic: Costa Rica  (Read 697 times)
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« on: June 27, 2014, 03:56:30 »

I was in Costa Rica and mostly only had a point and shoot camera but I managed to grab a few good pics of some bromeliads.

There are from the Tabacon Hotel near Arenal volcano. They had a few bromeliads in the ground but the trees in the area had quite a collection of plain green bromeliads. I'd guess they were Veriesia, Werauhia or Guzmania. Occasionally there were huge broms in the trees so I'd guess Werauhia. None were in bloom but there were some very old inflorescences on a few.

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Arenal Hanging Bridges, Werauhia kupperiana. There seemed to be kupperiana near every hanging bridge that had lots of light and trees that hung out in the void. I wasn't real happy standing in the rain on the swaying, hanging bridges taking pictures but I did manage a few. Those kupperianas were very impressive. The guide had no idea what they were but he did know it was a bromeliad.

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“If I could remember the names of all these particles, I'd be a botanist”, Enrico Fermi
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« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2014, 04:25:44 »

These huge Alcantareas were found at Monteverde Lodge and Garden in Monteverde. The people at the hotel were very apologetic when I asked about them because they knew they were from Brazil and not native. The people working at that hotel were great.

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The rest of these photos were taken at the top of one of the highest mountains near Monteverde. It was raining a bit, misty and the wind was cranking and I was quite cold.

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There were 2 of these growing 8 feet off the ground on the north side of a huge tree just down from the top of the mountain.
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This is the only Pitcairnia I found during the trip. The seeds did not seem to be ready.
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These were very common in the area. Often a nice red color and medium sized.
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I only saw two of this plant. One was in bloom but I wasn't able to get a pic. It looked like an Aechmea but might have been a Guzmania. The small inflorescence extended a bit above the leaves and had pink/yellow round bracts/flowers.
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“If I could remember the names of all these particles, I'd be a botanist”, Enrico Fermi
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« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2014, 09:58:59 »

Fantastico Nick!

I would love to have that much moisture here....

When you say cold, what you reckon the temp was up there?

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« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2014, 00:04:35 »

Hi everyone.

Nick, they're fabulous pictures of brom's in habitat, especially the clump of Werauhia plants in the first picture, what majestic looking plants.

I can certainly understand why you felt uncomfortable standing on a swaying wet branch in the rain taking pic's, especially the branch in Pic. 6; how high was that?

Great shots Nick, thanks for sharing.

All the best, Nev.
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« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2014, 01:57:44 »

The hanging bridges where 50 to 100 m long, http://www.hangingbridges.com/about/, and some of the bigger trees growing on the sides of the valley the bridges spanned could easily reach half way across. The straight drop in the center was probably 75m.

I don't know the actual temperature up in the mountains of Monteverde but I'd guess the wind chill was 40F.
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« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2014, 07:12:26 »

Hi Nick, thanks for the explanation;what a great place. All I need to do now is wind the clock back
about thirty years, win the Lotto and I'm off over there to see for myself.

75m. is a fair height, but then they say it's not the height but the sudden stop at the bottom that causes the problems if you fall.

All the best, Nev.
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« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2014, 08:57:26 »

I have had several looks over your post Nick with some jealousy, also Googled the place and looks very enticing. We have thoughts of a trip to South america so will put this cloud forest on the poss list. can see the accommodation and trails/walks look pretty good. Some questions,
1, how did you get there
2, how many days did you stay
3, how far and difficult are the walks

Some superb images , that Werauhia is a stand out, sadly too cold here for that plant, also vriesea in pic 3
Thanks for showing this, any more?...
cheers John + Agatha 
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« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2014, 19:42:35 »

Great pictures Nick and like everyone else I am jealous! I am learning Spanish now in anticipation of being able to visit Bromeliad Heaven myself one day!

Please post more and have fun!

Conrad
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« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2014, 01:49:34 »

Getting to Costa Rica is really easy and relatively cheap (for me) since I can just jump on one of the daily direct flights from Ft. Lauderdale. With CR being two timezones different I can get there in about 15 minutes and passing through CR customs is a breeze.

Pretty much everybody in CR under the age of 40 speaks English since they teach it in school. Renting a car is easy enough but you can also just get a shuttle to most anywhere you'd want to go. The buses that carry tourists are marked "Turismo" and seem to always be new and clean and have the right of way. Definitely an easy way to travel since the roads there aren't always the best.

On the other hand, I never once found anybody who actually knew the name of any bromeliad. Lots of people knew what a bromeliad was but not any names. If you want to do a bromeliad tour you might have to bring/be your own guide.
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“If I could remember the names of all these particles, I'd be a botanist”, Enrico Fermi
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