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Author Topic: Billbergia zebrina in the habitat  (Read 2588 times)
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Reginaldo
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« on: June 21, 2014, 00:41:55 »

Would be better if they were flowering, but only bloom in summer (December to March) here.


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splinter1804
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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2014, 02:25:40 »

Hi Reginaldo, Thanks for the great habitat pic's, we'll have to start calling you "Mr Habitat". It must be great to live in an area where you can go and view these plants growing naturally as nature intended.

Many "newbies" to growing brom's don't realise that many of our brom's are epiphytes as they have only ever been exposed to plants which are pot grown. Seeing pictures of them actually growing wild on a tree certainly helps to educate them about brom's and their natural conditions.

Many don't realise that we as growers only grow them in pots for our own convenience or because we don't have a suitable tree in our yard on which to grow them. Posting pictures like yours certainly adds to the ability of this forum to educate growers about habitats and conditions so that we may better understand the requirements of these plants, and one thing that becomes blatantly obvious is the abundance of circulating air around the plants growing in habitat as opposed to being enclosed within the confining walls of a pot.

I remember years ago when I grew orchids, I knew of an area where  Dendrobium teretifolium commonly called "Bridal Veil Orchid" (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dockrillia_teretifolia) grew in abundance on Swamp Oak trees. Although like many other growers, I had the odd plant in my personal collection but nothing gave me more satisfaction than to see these plants flowering in their natural environment in springtime, covered in thousands of delicate highly perfumed small flowers, and you could smell the beautiful fragrance long before you ever got close enough to see the actual flowering plants. Unfortunately this whole area has long ago fallen a victim to the Bulldozer, all in the name of progress.

Thanks for sharing your habitat pictures with us and keep up the good work.

All the best, Nev.
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2014, 02:50:26 »

It is a shame so many plants are lost by falling victim to the Bulldozer.
Plants we will never see, as not all plants are "discovered" yet.
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Reginaldo
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« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2014, 16:00:17 »

Nev and Sanshine_Qld,
And for rupicolous plants (many species of Dyckia, Encholirium, orchids, cacti) a major threat is mining because many species are endemic to a small area and  mining destroys completely the habitat.

Extraction of quartzite, with loads of waste:

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Extraction of hematite to steel:

On one side of the mountain
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the other side of the same mountain:

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splinter1804
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« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2014, 22:52:34 »

Hi everyone - Or should I just say Reginaldo, where's everyone gone again?

What you show seems to be just a small part of the same big story all over the world. A case of man chasing the almighty dollar and not giving a toss about what they destroy whilst chasing it.

What's the name of the lonely looking little orchid in your first picture? What a vivid shade of yellow. Is that also destined to be bulldozed?

I remember years ago when a friend and myself were in an area photographing native orchids; it was a forestry area in Northern N.S.W. Australia and usually out of bounds to everyone, but because the chap we were staying with was a retired forestry worker and still had lots of contacts in the forestry industry, he was able to obtain permission for us to go into various areas as it was during the Christmas holiday period and no one was working.

These areas were either recently cleared or were going to be cleared and it was heart breaking to see all the native epiphytic ochids just lying about on broken branches on the ground waiting to be bulldozed. It was forbidden to take even one plant as it was a forestry area and the only thing to be taken out was timber, a rule which was strictly enforced.

As we walked through we came to an open but heavily shaded area which was covered by an enormous colony of Calanthe triplicata (Christmas Orchid). It must have been twenty feet across and these wonderful orchids were covered in their beautiful white flowers, truly a sight to behold, and would you believe it, we had previously used up all our film (this was before digital cameras).

It didn't matter though as I still have this picture firmly etched on my brain as though I saw it yesterday and it's a sight I'll never forget. We found out some time later that this whole area had been cleared and the whole colony wiped out of existence; fortunately it wasn't a rare plant as it grows in many other local N.S.W locations as well as many other countries of the world., but this destruction is just a tiny example of what's happening all over the world today.

I know I've strayed off topic, but exactly the same things are happening to bromeliads in their natural habitats, and there's no doubt that even as I write this, there are species being wiped out; even some that are possibly still undiscovered. This is why as bromeliad growers we all have an obligation to grow at least a few species in all of our collections so that the ones that we do have in the domestic environment at least are never allowed to die out.

I'll get down off my soap box now.

All the best, Nev.

Calanthe triplicata
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Reginaldo
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« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2014, 00:24:15 »

Nev, it was a Laelia flava (= Cattleya crispata). The sentence is in the past because the plant surely do not exist more
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2014, 11:28:41 »

It is sad to see. The one thing that is rarely mentioned as a reason for climate change is how much land is cleared.
I firmly believe that is one of the main causes.
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splinter1804
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« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2014, 23:11:52 »

Hi everyone,

Once more we see another area raped and more species wiped out from a particular area; let's hope there are still some left in other areas.

I never realised that Laelia flava had such a long inflorescence. I had hybrids with Laelia flava as a parent, but the inflorescence was only just clear of the foliage, however they still retained that brilliant yellow colour.

I read somewhere recently that now Ae. pineliana var. minuta is extinct in its natural habitat; so I appeal to all of you bromeliad growers who have it in your collections, please continue to grow it and share some plants around with other growers who don't have it as we must never let this attractive little brom. become extinct in domestic horticulture as well.

All the best, Nev.

Ae. pineliana var. minuta
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Reginaldo
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« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2015, 00:42:22 »

Flowering today. Always stands out among the native vegetation.
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« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2015, 02:27:42 »

Hi all, Reginaldo glad you have taken the time and patience to show off this bill at flowering, thank you and yes can see the floro petals must be seen from some distance away. Do you know what pollinates this one ? or does it self ?
Cheers jaga
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Reginaldo
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« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2015, 23:23:19 »

Hi everyone.

Jaga, I think that this species is not self pollinates. In my house B. zebrina never produced seeds, probably because there was only one flowering plant that period. In the habitat usually occurs good pollination of flowers.
I do not know which is the pollinator, perhaps hummingbirds
In the habitat is common to find a frog in each B. zebrina.
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splinter1804
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« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2015, 23:41:03 »

Hi everyone.

Reginaldo - Thanks so much for posting this picture of Bill. zebrina in flower, it just goes to show that even in habitat and having to battle all the elements, it can still produce an inflorescence as beautiful as any grown in private collections.

This plant doesn't appear to be growing on a tree like the two previous ones you posted and can you tell me if it's in the same area and what part of the country it's in?

Thanks for sharing, it's very much appreciated.

All the best, Nev.
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Reginaldo
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« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2015, 00:32:56 »

Hi Nev,
Yes, it´s in the same area (30 - 50 m from the others two)
This plant was born spontaneously on bricks abandoned at the forest edge. On the bricks, over time,exist a layer of dried leaves and there germinated seed of this plant.
The area is near São Carlos (22° 00´ S  47° 53´W), São Paulo state.
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Reginaldo
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« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2015, 17:25:43 »

I returned to the place of B. zebrina and found that there was good pollination. I find it interesting that in the habitat is common to have good pollination, and when this species flourished at home here was never pollinated
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splinter1804
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« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2015, 21:23:47 »

Hi everyone.

Reginaldo - Thanks for another very interesting pic of a plant in habitat. It just goes to show how these wonderful plants can adapt, even to the extent of growing on some discarded old man-made bricks, I notice there's even one of the plant tubes growing out of the hole in the end of the brick. Just another example of how plants in habitat can adapt to change.

Regarding your comment about pollination, maybe it's a particular insect or small bird in habitat that isn't in your home growing area that's responsible for the pollination.

Thanks for sharing.

All the best, Nev.
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