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Author Topic: Harvesting of Tillandsia pods.  (Read 4101 times)
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #30 on: September 03, 2014, 15:19:32 »

I was hoping for a yellow Jersey!  Grin Grin

Conrad
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« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2014, 22:49:21 »

Hi everyone - Great stuff Conrad. They say "patience is a virtue", I'd say it's very much a bloody necessity when growing Tillandsia seed. I once planed some Till. seed and Neo seed at the same time, three years later the Neo's were about 4" high and starting to really move along and the Till's were at a standstill at about 1/3", so I gave them to a friend.

WHO AM I? - I don't remember the name of the particular Tillandsia seed I grew, but I think the name started with an "R".  I do remember being astonished when I saw the plant. Until then, I had thought all Tillandsias were only little plants but this one was a giant almost waist high with an arching inflorescence which went from one side of a path over to the other side. My friend told me that this particular Tillandsia didn't produce pups and the only way to reproduce it once it had flowered was to grow the seed and that's why she was sending seed to her friends all over Australia.

The friend I gave the seed to grew them for another year without much change in size until they finally succumbed to an overnight freeze where he lives, so a not very successful outcome.

All the best, Nev.
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #32 on: October 26, 2014, 14:06:25 »

Day 424....I welcome the rain this weekend and it has been a blessing all round.

The Gardenerii seedlings are as Gonz said.."Pumped!"

they are doing very well. I will have to take them out of the little hot house soon and ween them off to the natural elements.

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Gnarly dude!


« Reply #33 on: October 27, 2014, 13:18:52 »

Super growth rate Conrad. What're you gonna do with a thousand gardneri plants?Huh
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THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED HERE ARE SOLELY MY OWN BASED ON EXPERIENCE AND NOT THE MANAGEMENT'S
chefofthebush
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« Reply #34 on: March 03, 2015, 15:16:44 »

Hi all, Another update! Day 545.....

All round the growth is good. I am getting also ready to sow the next batch of gardenrii seed! The pods are about to pop! I have another head ripening of a gardenii x ionantha. I pollinated the whole flower spike in that crossing.

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Gonz, I judge there to be a few hundred plants only. Once they are hardened off I will most likely loose a few more.

Conrad
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« Reply #35 on: March 03, 2015, 21:52:24 »

Hi everyone.

Conrad - This has been a very informative thread (even for non Tilly growers like me) and the accompanying photographic record only adds to its value. I especially like your last picture showing one of the seedlings growing on the wooden side of the mesh frame; it just goes to show how the need to survive will find a way.

However, apart from Gonz’s opinion, there are no other answers to your original question, “Can Tillandsia seed pod be harvested early? “

I can only speak of what I found many years ago when growing orchid seed. (Remember, I’m talking about fifty years ago and things have no doubt undergone many changes since then, but how we did it then did work very well for us). It’s important to understand that orchid seed is very different to bromeliad seed and can be like a very fine powder when dry and doesn’t have the same mechanisms for dispersal as that of various types of brom seed.
 
I can’t specifically answer your question about Tillandsia pods, but I do know that we always grew our orchid seed using the “green pod method”. In other words we cut the pod open before the seed was fully ripe and scraped out the seed (using a sterile scalpel) onto the growing medium (I don’t know if this would work for Tillandsias or other bromeliad seed and I guess the only way to find out would be by trial and error.)

This had a couple of important benefits; firstly, while ever the seed was in the pod it was clinically sterile and free from any harmful bacterial and fungal contaminants. This eliminated the necessity of washing the seed in sodium hyperchlorite (NaOCl) to sterilise it before sowing which was normal when using dry seed.

Secondly, there was considerable time saved (I think around three months) as the seed could be sown much earlier but still with at least the same and often better results. (It is this time saving aspect that I thought would be beneficial when growing Till’s if it works)

If you have an excess of green pods which you can experiment on, it would probably be a worthwhile exercise, and I for one would be interested in the results.

All the best, Nev.
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #36 on: March 05, 2015, 06:58:32 »

Hi all,

Nev, I have tried with unopened pods, but to no avail. Gonzer said I had to check that the seed "fluffed up" when exposed o the air, and that has been my bar of measure up to now. I wait for the pods to start showing signs of splitting at the tip. (I will take some photos the next time I collect.)
Then I monitor the pods on a daily basis. Once further movement is noticed, I pick the pods, Break them open and spread the seeds onto my already labeled shade cloth frames. I leave them indoors and out of a draft for a few hours to the the seed to fluff up and then evenly ( as best I can) spread them out over the shade cloth. I use a spray bottle to damp them down and get them to stick to the shade cloth before moving them into my small green house. ( The slightest draft will lift up those seeds if the are not weighted down by some water!. Don't try and move them without damping down.)

I have had success with Neo unripe fruits but not yet with Tillandsias. If any one has, Tell us your secret!

Conrad
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« Reply #37 on: March 26, 2015, 14:37:08 »

Hi All.... Regarding the collection or harvesting of the seeds. Again I am using T. gardenii as the seed pods are ready!

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A few pods had opened by them selves, so I harvested the lot.

I snap them open....and pull out the seeds and attached "fluff"

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The "fluffy" hairs should start expanding immediately when exposed to the air.

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I spread them around on the shade net trays I have made...

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and try to enev them out....somewhat! All this happened in less than 4 minutes.

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A good misting to settle the seeds down and keep them in place.

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and now to wait for another 5 years......for this batch!

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Yours patiently,

Conrad

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chefofthebush
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« Reply #38 on: April 16, 2015, 16:53:40 »

And away they go!

20 or so days after sowing!

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Conrad
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« Reply #39 on: April 16, 2015, 23:42:03 »

Hi everyone.

Conrad - Great Stuff! "The birth of a Tillandsia in Pictures"; sounds like a good name for a book doesn't it?

It's good that you're young and have the patience; I tried Tillandsias here once, they germinated and got to the stage where they were jut pushing out tiny leaves and there they stopped; and stayed stopped; after a year I gave them to a friend and he lost the lot during a cold snap, so he did worse than me.

I think I'll stick to Neo's and Bill's as they don't take as long.

Thanks for sharing.

All the best, Nev.
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« Reply #40 on: April 17, 2015, 08:13:43 »

Conrad, that exciting. I hope the 5 year projection comes true like Nev Ive not had much to do with tills but was given some seed of a Vriesea x Till in 2008, so 7 years on and Im down to one surviving seedling 75mm high, I tell ya they are extremely slow. I have decided to give mine a big boost of fert to see if it grows any quicker. So will be very interested to follow your seeds progress and your growing method.
Great series of images and like Nev says will be good for a book.

Cheers Jaga
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #41 on: April 17, 2015, 18:57:13 »

Thanks for the comments Nev & Jaga.

I think my success is due to having the seedling trays in a small greenhouse that is standing over two trays filled with water. two slits at the bottom of the greenhouse and two on top for ventilation and then the occasional watering via misters. I am planning a large scale construction "soon"  of this type of seedling house and want to put a heated pond of water therein. My only concern is the hardening off of the seedlings. I will start tackling the first batch of gardenii soon.

Will keep you posted on that.

Best wishes,

conrad
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« Reply #42 on: December 05, 2015, 18:45:43 »

Finally....it has come time for me to start mounting these little buggers! It is now about 2 and a half years from sowing. The preceding posts a testament to that. But at last I can now start doing something active except watering and taking photos!

But one more photo. The seedlings are doing great and have good root development.

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Next I divided them up and then using hot melt glue gun (set on low heat) to attach them onto recycled wood. I spaced them about an 2 inches apart and used both sides of the wood. This is to minimize space. They are then just hung from my shade cloth, a little out of the strong winds.

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Conrad
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