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Author Topic: corrugations and damage on Vriesea guttata leaves  (Read 643 times)
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void
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« on: January 20, 2013, 06:48:34 »

Hi All,

Does anyone have an idea what might be causing the corrugations/damage on this Vriesea guttata.
I have 3 plants, 2 of which are mounted, the third, potted, plant is not showing signs of this. The mounted plants are on tree fern and cork, respectively. Both receive the same watering regime and general treatment. No pesticides or oils, etc have been used.

I water with tap water, the pH of which is around 7, EC around 125, which is a good range.

Any ideas?

Kind regards,
Erik
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Kayleen C
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2013, 10:59:55 »

I would think the mounted ones are drying out way quicker than the potted one.
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void
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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2013, 10:34:36 »

Thanks for the reply Sunshine_Qld,

The plants are misted every morning around 1am for 1 minute. Their tanks always have moisture. Admittedly, their roots are only barely covered with moss, which does dry out moderstely rapidly.

I'd have expected the older, outer, leaves to show damage first as the plants prioritise moisture to the new growth, if drying was a major problem. As your suggestion is the best I've considered thus far, I'll happily go with it!

Many thanks again,
Erik
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« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2013, 01:50:45 »

Hi everyone

Erik, I must admit that my first thoughts are in line with what Sunshine suggested.

You say you have three plants, two of which are mounted and showing damage and a third which is container grown and doesn't show any damage. In my experience I think the problem has to be either with the method of mounting, the type of material they are mounted on, the location of the mounted plants, the availability of nutrition or a problem with the watering.

Method of mounting: The most common problem with mounted plants is that they aren't secured firmly enough and can move. While ever this happens the roots cannot attach to the host and the mounting will never be successful.

The type of material used for a mount: I don't consider this is your problem as I have successfully used both of these materials as mounts in the past.

Location: Are these two plants in a similar location to the plant in the pot. Are they in a draft free area and are they getting good light?

The availability of nutrition: Usually all mounted plants require the addition of some sort of nutrition in the form of a foliar spray as there is no nutritional value in the host alone. Unlike container grown plants growing in a potting mix where the roots are usually able to find some type of nutrient, mounted plants don't have this luxury and it's therefore up to you to provide it. Put simply, if you never get anything to eat you will gradually get sick and eventually die.

Watering: This just leaves watering to consider; you say, "Both receive the same watering regime and general treatment. No pesticides or oils, etc have been used." by this am I to understand that they are watered at the same rate as the third plant in the pot? If this is the case then this is most likely your problem and probably the most common cause of mounted plants not doing well. You should never forget that with mounted plants the roots are exposed to lots of circulating air which is a good thing. But it also means that they will dry much quicker than a plant confined to a pot without the same amount of air circulating around the roots and this needs to be compensated for by extra watering. Remember when watering a mounted plant a good deal of the water will just run off, not like a pot where it will be retained. Therefore the rule for watering mounted plants is little and often. I was once told by a man who grew beautiful ferns and stag horns mounted on bits of wood and his secret he said was, "give them a squirt of water when ever you walk past them"

All the best, Nev.




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void
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« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2013, 10:57:47 »

Brilliant explanation Nev, thank you!

The mounted plants are separated by a few meters, but with one receiving slightly more light than the other. Both are misted so that the moss surrounding the root area is always alive, and only rarely allowed to brown a little (in winter, when I water a little less). I have Vriesea vagans, Canistropsis burchellii , Aechmea 'Xavante', Aechmea 'Mirlo', Canistrum triangulare, Billbergia 'Halleluja', Vriesea corcovadensis, Vriesea lubbersii, Aechmea pauciflora, etc. etc. all growing mounted in the same area, with modewrately similar watering regimes and all doing well! They are grown on vertically aligned sleepers, with higher light requiring species above, and all mounted plants arrayed from top to bottom, according to their light requirements. All other species are doing well.

I feel I have provided good middle ground with the Vr. guttata's, preventing all plants from drying, preventing all plants from being overly moist for too long, and all receiving very good air flow. They are grown under a clear fibreglass roof, with minimally impeeded air venting to all sides.

I must admit that this summer I have held back on foliar feeding, to see how the plants respond, in terms of colour and growth.

As you mention, it may be that this is the first species to show signs of nutrient deficiency. It does, to my eye, look like how a calcium deficiency may be expressed, as per other species (deformed new growth).

I'll also take on board that they might appreciate more moisture. Thanks again.
Erik
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« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2013, 03:17:22 »

Hi Erik,

I've had a few Vrieseas produce new growth this season showing what seems like a more exaggerated version of this, with emerging leaves that have become so corrugated that they grab together and prevent each other from opening out properly.  The same thing has been happening with some Aechmeas and Neos as well.  I haven't been doing anything different and the plants haven't been drying out, so I've come to the tentative conclusion that either something has changed in the chemistry of the water supply (pH is still as before), or the hot/cold/hot/cold weather we've had so much of this spring/summer has caused a lot of start/stop/start/stop growth that is causing the problem.

I'm not at all sure of either explanation, so I'd be very interested if others have experienced similar problems, especially if they have found a solution!

Cheers, Paul
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