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Author Topic: Nice Aechmea needing identification  (Read 579 times)
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chefofthebush
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« on: October 04, 2012, 00:29:38 »

Please help me Identify this Aechmea. The plant is 35 – 55 cm. tall. A rather sturdy plant. It has a stunning flower. Upright spike reaching 70 cm. I thought it might be Aechmea candida, but the flowers are yellow. The leaf tips are black as with Aechmea blumenavii but the flower colour is wrong. The flowers resemble more A. caudata, but the spike is un-branched. The flower is much longer than Aechmea kertesziae compared to the FCBS photos. The flowers are to neatly space for an Aechmea winkleri and again no branching. I have searched the FCBS database and I cannot find it in the species list, so I guess it must be a hybrid.  Any ideas?

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Thanks

Conrad
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chefofthebush
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« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2012, 14:46:25 »

After many days and hours of looking back over any material on Bromeliads I could find, I found this article in the Bromeliad Society’s archives.

“Journal of the Bromeliad Society Vol: XXVIII MAY—JUNE, 1978

An Aechmea Hybrid

BERNARD STONOR
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The Hybrid
It is always tempting to cross-pollinate two species of bromeliads when they happen to flower at the same time. If the cross is successful and seed is produced, there is still a long wait, usually several years, before the result of the cross can be seen. Fortunately, the percentage of worth-while plants resulting from this process appears to be reasonably high, so the number of hybrid plants in cultivation is increasing quite fast.
Many of those which are now being distributed don't seem to have a registered name, and no details of the parentage are given. This seems to me to be rather unfortunate and can only lead to much confusion. As I understand the rules of nomenclature, it would seem that when a name is given to a hybrid, it is a general name applicable to the grex as a whole and we very seldom see a selected clone of a cross given a varietal name. I would have thought that it was essential to name an individual clone, or clones, to prevent confusion.
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The Parents:   Right — Aechmea cylindrata   Left — Aechmea caudata
One of the problems which confronts us when naming a hybrid is that we have to be quite certain of the identity of the parents. This is possibly one reason why many hybrids are not registered; the parents may themselves be unnamed hybrids or unidentified species. This is the case with the hybrid described in this article. The seed parent is known and agrees with the published descriptions of Aechmea cylindrata. However, the pollen parent is a problem plant. It is usually grown in Australia under the name of Aechmea caudata, but the description of both the plant and the inflorescence differ from those given in the books and keys. The plant, for instance, has large blue-black tips to the leaves. The inflorescence is glabrous but still flocculose. Both parents are strong, vigorous plants with rather dark green glossy leaves and both have attractive flowers, so it was hoped that something worth while would turn up in the hybrids. The cross was made in 1972 and so far two of the seedlings, selected for their vigor, have flowered. The plants resemble Aechmea cylindrata closely, except that some leaves have a little black at the tip. The flowers are similar in both clones, differing slightly in color, being paler in one plant. The scape is robust as in cylindrata, but more or less brown in color. The inflorescence is simple and about eight inches long. It is more open than that of cylindrata, due to the individual flowers being smaller. The actual flowers are more of the form of the Aechmea caudata-type parent, rather narrow with a small ovary. The color is orange-red with blue petals in one seedling, light orange with pale blue-green petals in the other. After flowering the whole inflorescence turned more or less green, but later this changed to a nice shade of pink which appears to be long lasting. The plants are hardy and produce offsets freely.
Another interesting hybrid flowered at the same time; this is the plant known as Aechmea 'Nallyii,' the parents of which are unknown. There are several points of resemblance between this old favorite and the hybrid just described. Both have more or less orange flowers, and in both cases the flowers near the center of the inflorescence open first. 'Nallyii' has pea-green petals and a very dense spike. I wonder if Aechmea cylindrata could be one parent with the other A. calyculata or something of the sort. I think this cross — A. cylindrata × A. calyculata would be worth trying if it has not already been made.
Margaret River, West Australia”

Am I on the right track……?
Conrad
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