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Author Topic: rocks in pots  (Read 794 times)
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rayy
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« on: August 13, 2012, 15:00:54 »

Hi everyone. Would Vr and Alcantaria growers who have placed a rock under their plants in pots, to help stop rot I believe, have knowledge of any damage of placing broken pieces of concrete lumps in place of rock? Neighbors have broken up their concrete garden edges and we scored the broken pieces to use as support for our pots. The idea of the broms growing on to rocks or trees sounds great but we have a shortage of suitable trees. Would the cement or lime in the concrete be damaging ? or should we get a load of river rock?Any information would be gratefully received. Thanks Ray
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Rickta66
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« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2012, 15:11:52 »

Hi Ray,

Are you planning on adding this to the mix or growing Alcs on it?

There are a few growers I know using broken concrete in their mix to try and colour Hohenbergia castellanosii - I think it was PT's idea.

Rocks are often placed in Alc pots to balance out or stabilise a pot but I think they use it up North to control rot as well.

Cheers,

Rick
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rayy
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« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2012, 00:03:42 »

Hello Rick, Our plan is to actually get foliage Vr to grow onto a piece of concrete in a pot.  I read a post under topic by Bromadorer, "Help pink nova",where Aroideana put up a picture of Peter at Whyanbeel growing gigantea onto a rock in pot and we thought it a great idea as beside helping to stop rot it also stabilised the potted plant. Our only concern was concrete and not rock.  We bought Alc. Geniculata, Heloisae and another Imperialis a few months ago and placed a good sized rock under them (going great) Sorry not able to refer to members right names,will have to take note when they are posting.  Thanks Ray
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Brod
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Aechmea lilacinantha


« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2012, 05:02:42 »

Hi Ray and Rick, I believe most broms like an acid ph, but some grow happily on limestone. I just recently tried an experimental mix with a high proportion of blue metal rock. Afterwards I thought I would do a ph test on the rock and to my dismay the rock was quite alkaline. Concrete would be in that category with limestone as its base. If you got some basalt rock that would be better, but since brom roots serve mainly to anchor the plant and not so much to take up nutrient (though they adapt to do this if given the opportunity) concrete may not be so bad. I guess we will know when someone tries it.
Cheers
Brod
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Rickta66
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« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2012, 12:43:26 »

Good points Brod,

One point about the roots being used primarily as anchoring, this does not appear to be consistant across all Bromeliad types, I know Alcs respond well to Slow Release fertiliser all the way through their lifecycle so their roots must be continually functioning as feeding mechanism. Some Neoregelias roots do seem to switch from a Feeding system to an anchorage system only as they mature.

Ray, Let us know how you go, you can always stop the exercise if your plant starts to deteriorate.

Cheers,

Rick
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pedro
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« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2012, 13:50:33 »

Hi

The concrete wasn't my idea, Aaron's (Dooleybugs from memory) and I officially report that the solidified cement in the mix was a failure and nearly killed the plants, so I repotted in a normal acidic mix and saved the buggars. Aaron was to report on growing castellanosii epiphytically too. As for rocks in pots, hell, they get too heavy! I use foam bits to lighten the pots!

Cheers, Pedro
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Brod
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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2012, 14:06:11 »

I would be happy to hear of Aarons report on castellanosii. I'm going to go to the far right and far left with mine. It has developed quite a large bunch of pups so I'm going to whip 2 off, one to anchor on my hot tin roof to keep my solar panels company the other is going in the garden with a big diet of fertilizer. Lets see what happen to them.

Cheers
Brod
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rayy
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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2012, 00:55:11 »

Hi, Thanks Rick,Brod and Pedro, Maybe I will keep the concrete on the ground at the base outside the pots to help hold them up as was first intended. Pedro saying the solidified cement nearly killed his plants is what I was trying to find out. As for the rocks making the pots too heavy Pedro, I just let the Misses do the moving. Appreciate your input .  Ray
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