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Author Topic: Aechmea Malva  (Read 1435 times)
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rayy
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« on: April 16, 2012, 11:48:41 »

Hi At the risk of displaying my lack of knowledge of bromeliads, i have a question about growing from seed. Malva, is it a cultivar or species.  On the cultivar register, no parentage, on the FCBS, IT SAYS  MULFORDII CULTIVAR WITH TAXONOMIC RANK, SPECIES? So if i sow seed from Malva what do i get ?? Please, Rayy
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Lisa
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2012, 19:15:10 »

Rayy, cultivar and species are not necessarily mutually exclusive terms.  Cultivar is short for "cultivated variety", i.e. a particular form that has been selected to be propagated, whether it be of hybrid or species origin.  Ae. Malva is a selected clone of Ae. mulfordii, distinctive because of its dark foliage.  As to what you will get if you grow it from seed, I can't say for certain how closely any of the seedlings will resemble the mother, but unless it has been propagated vegetatively, you can't call the offspring Malva.  If they are a result of self-pollination they will still be Ae. mulfordii, just not the same selected clone.  You could tag them Ae. Malva x self. 
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« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2012, 19:27:03 »

Technically speaking, you can't reproduce a cultivar from seed. I've always heard that Malva was wild collected and assumed to be a form of mulfordii but no one ever bothered to describe it as a form, variety or species so it's stuck as a cultivar until that happens. There are a fair number of cultivars that are in this state. I think there are some different forms of Malva around so maybe if you grow some F2's they will look pretty similar to the seed parent. They should be called Malva F2.
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rayy
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« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2012, 11:32:30 »

Hi, LISA AND 378. Thanks for the information on Aech Malva.   Much appreciated.. Rayy
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Wal
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« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2012, 08:09:45 »

I have one of these but am not sure if it needs to go in full sun or no, could you please give a novice a tip on growing Malva best, thank you.
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« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2012, 11:00:06 »

Hi Wal,

I'm in Sydney and for me 'Malva' colours well in full sun for most of the day, including through the middle of the day, and only burns a bit on the real scorchers in mid-summer.  If I could find a spot that gave it a bit of shade only in the middle of the day in mid summer,  I reckon that would probably be ideal for me.  Maybe a bit less sun would be a good idea if you are a long way further north, or inland? 

It certainly doesn't bleach in full sun the way some of the other related Aechmeas do.

Cheers, Paul

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« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2012, 14:40:38 »

Thanks Paul, this helps a lot. One more on this brom, how big does it get ? Is it close to blanchetiana sizes ?
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« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2012, 21:50:55 »

Hi Wal, here in Brisbane I grew 'Malva' in full sun and it was a disappointment, it went yellow in many places and was a bit burnt. A few hours of morning sun or afternoon sun would be ok in our location.
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« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2012, 01:50:09 »

They don't get as big as blanchetiana but they do get to be a good size. Even in the winter I can't grow Malva in full sun.
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« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2012, 05:24:29 »

Hi all,

Interesting to see those comments from Brod and Nick.  I'm wondering if we have yet another plant where there are at least a couple of different clones going around under the same name.  That one of mine cops a lot of full sun through summer and while I'd expect a little bit more damage heading a long way north, I wouldn't expect that much, since the amount of sunlight hitting the ground is actually pretty similar during the peak months of the year.

I was checking this out a while ago for another discussion and thought the results might be of interest. The numbers are total kilowatt hours of solar energy per square metre of ground per day and I'm giving the averages for the top 2 months of the year. Data are from NASA. Here's a few Australian cities: Sydney 6.1, Brisbane 6.3, Cairns 6.7, Cooktown 6.6, compared to locations in coastal Bahia in Brazil where a lot of these big Aechmeas grow, around 5.8-6.4.

One I looked at that really jumped out was Perth in Western Australia - 8.5 kilwatt hours per square metre per day. Youch!!! Think of 4 x 2 kilowatt room heaters with exposed elements all blazing straight onto a square metre for an hour.  That's a fair bit of energy to deal with.

So, distance from the equator can have a bit of an effect (mainly during winter) but the number of clear-sky days and the amount of moisture/haze in the air can make a huge difference to the amount of energy hitting the ground.

Hmmmm..... maybe the plants are all the same clone and Brod (Brisbane) is in a spot that cops a lot more sun than other Brisbane areas and that accounts for the difference.  Or, maybe I'm in a spot that cops a lot less sun than other areas around Sydney - which is entirely possible with a lot of showers and cloud restricted to the near-coastal areas where I am ................

So ....... that didn't really get anywhere, did it   Roll Eyes  I guess you just need to stick a 'Malva' outside and see what it does  Grin

Cheers, Paul
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« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2012, 10:59:29 »

Hmmm...I think I'll just put it out and see what happens. Safe for now in Winter here anyway. Besides, we don't get any sun here any more, it just rains all the time. Cry
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« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2012, 11:43:21 »

Hey Wal,

I've just arrived home from work on a lovely Friday mid-winter evening, donned the headtorch + accessories and had a trundle around the yard, including a long, hard look at my 'Malva'.  The upshot is that I'm going to follow Brod's & Nick's advice by moving it to a spot where it gets a bit more shade in the middle of the day in summer, like somewhere on the north side of something that slightly overhangs it ....... although I'm not sure what yet  Shocked   

I love the super-dark, almost vibrant purple-black colour it has at the moment, but when I look at it critically, I reckon it could look a whole lot better without all those holes in the leaves from the top 30's-40's scorchers over the last few years.

I hope your rain stops eventually!

Cheers, Paul
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