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Author Topic: Tillandsia Workshop Brisbane  (Read 1193 times)
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Bruce
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« on: February 14, 2012, 05:00:01 »

Hi All

Here are some snaps of some of the plants that were for sale on the day, courtesy of Chris Larson and some of the flowering plants that were taken along on the day for discussion.

cheers Bruce

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brilliantbroms
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2012, 15:36:54 »

Hi Bruce,

Some nice plants that's for sure... what is the name of the largest Till featured in pic 2?

Cheers,
Roland.
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Bruce
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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2012, 23:56:04 »

Hi Roland

The large red flowered plant is a hybrid Barry Genn did a few years ago. Barry is pretty sure it was a cross of T. ferreyrae and T. fasiculata Red. When I got mine from Barry it was mounted on cork I then potted it into a coarse mix and fed it with slow release and liquid fertiliser. This is the first to flower although the plant is yet to produce actual flowers.

cheers Bruce
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Mitche
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2012, 06:03:01 »

Nice pics and plants Bruce. Is the large plant with the hanging inflorescence sitting on the table T. prodigiosa??
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Bruce
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« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2012, 00:06:37 »

Hi Mitche

It is T. juerg-rutschmannii and in that image was still pretty much in bud. Here is an image from the BSI journal in full spike.
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This is a better snap of the T. ferreyrae X fasiculata Red, which should be getting a name soon when Barry decides.

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brilliantbroms
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« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2012, 01:50:54 »

That is great Bruce - did you say the one brought to the BSQ meeting and pictured in the third pic was possibly Tillandsia calcicola?

Cheers, Roland.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2012, 01:53:07 by brilliantbroms » Logged
Bruce
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« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2012, 08:32:37 »

Roland
No calcicola. In pic 3 the large bent over pinkish spike is T. carnosa var brevistipitata. The orange/red spike next to it is possibly T calothrysus and the one below was T fasiculata clavispica but is probably now T. inopinnata. the thin thing at the very bottom is
 T mima var. chiletensis
Hope that clears things up or more likely confuses things
cheers Bruce
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brilliantbroms
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« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2012, 13:37:23 »

Thanks Bruce - Remembering latin names is not my strong point. Cheers, Roland.
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gonzer
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Gnarly dude!


« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2012, 14:35:13 »

Also Bruce, in the 3rd pic, is that a T. hildae and a young T. rauhii on the table?
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Bruce
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« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2012, 00:56:34 »

Hi Gonzer

Full marks!. The hildae produce adventitious pups readily under good nutritional conditions, so I'm always pulling pups off the original plant. The rauhii were seedlings but now they too are producing pups that can be taken off and treated like seedlings.

cheers Bruce
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