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Author Topic: UNKNOWN Till.  (Read 1284 times)
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TILLIBROM
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« on: October 05, 2010, 20:18:47 »

I do not need a photo, I need a 'name'! I have bought this Till. as "Tillandsia bark" from a local nursery. I cannot find such a Till in any handbook or on fcbs and came to the conclusion that it might have been called 'bark' since it was attached to piece of bark! Could it be some kind of aeranthos ??
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MadeiraBroms
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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2010, 22:22:44 »

Looks like a hybrid of T. tenuifolia---not sure which one.
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Robin
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2011, 12:19:00 »

This looks like one of Rolf Rawe's hybrids from the mid 80's - it is T. bergeri x aeranthos.  Points to note are the more caulescent growth from (similar to bergeri) as well as paler flower colour - not the intense blue-purple of aeranthos.  Also if grown under low light you will find that the bracts are a pale flesh pink similar to bergeri.  When grown with one of the two forms of aeranthos (1 a long-leafed green form that is somewhat caulescent and has small inflorescences on long peduncles that is originally from Brazil, 2 a very tightly clustering form with green-grey leaves and dense inflorescence on short peduncles (similar to T. stricta) that is originally from Buenos Aires, Argentina and is the most commonly encountered form of aeranthos in South Africa) you will notice the diffence in growth form and flowers.  However when not in flower the hybrid is almost impossible to tell apart from the species - I know because I had to try and separate them out of my huge clumps of aeranthos last year!

Cheers

Robin
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Rickta66
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2011, 12:28:56 »

Bark is possibly could be Bak, having said that I couldn't find any Bak Tillandsias on FCBS that looked like yours.

Rick
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Z
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2011, 13:15:46 »

Tillibrom, it is either T.tenuifolia x jucunda or T.aeranthos x jucunda (if the infl. is quite robust - as in this case - it seems it is the latter). I hav done both these hybrids the past ten years (so has a good friend in Plet - Valhalla Bromeliads). Hope this helps.
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gonzer
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Gnarly dude!


« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2011, 13:32:44 »

Quote
Bark is possibly could be Bak, having said that I couldn't find any Bak Tillandsias on FCBS that looked like yours.
That would be short for 'Baker', the botanist from the 19th century. This would likely make it a species.
The hybrids of aeranthos, stricta, tenuifolia, etc., can be extremely difficult to peg down. Do the petals flare out at anthesis?
« Last Edit: January 14, 2011, 14:13:10 by gonzer » Logged

THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED HERE ARE SOLELY MY OWN BASED ON EXPERIENCE AND NOT THE MANAGEMENT'S
Robin
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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2011, 09:08:38 »

Ahhh the joy of unnamed hybrids!  We all agree on one thing - it is a hybrid!  So I checked all my pics and my living collection and have reached a consensus - Casper you appear to be right - aeranthos x jucunda look to be the best fit - the long leaves are jucunda and the very compact inflorescence and thick textured inflated bracts also come from jucunda.  We could all be wrong on parentage though as who knows what is carried over in a hybrid!  I would bet my bottom dollar on aeranthos being one of the parents - all hybrids I have seen with aeranthos look quite similar as regards bract colour and flower colour - even a hybrid with recurvifolia var subsecundifolia produces inflorescences with pinky-red bracts and blue flowers (dissapointing actually - orange with blue would have been nice!)

Cheers

Robin
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Z
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« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2011, 12:24:12 »

Hi Robin, while i might be right about the id - Gonz might be more on the spot; always difficult to id these hybrids.
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