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Author Topic: Choco Colombia Guzmania diversity  (Read 920 times)
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Bruce
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« on: January 25, 2012, 05:22:49 »

Hi All

Here are some Guzmanias we saw travelling from El Cairo towards San Jose del Palmar last August.
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G. oligantha



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G. rosea



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G. nidularioides



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G. sp. nov. aff nidularioides



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G. testudinis Var. splendida or G. diffusa ?



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G. kressii



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Me with G. kressii. I was a little excited at that stage



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G. sp ?



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G. sp ?
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Bruce
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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2012, 05:49:13 »

Whoops I missed this sp.

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Guzmania rugosa



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G. rugosa first collected in 1977 and we may have been the first people to photograph the plant in flower.

cheers Bruce
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Rickta66
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« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2012, 09:15:51 »

Stunning pictures Bruce,

I hope you are multiplying some up for us.

Rick
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BobS
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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2012, 12:44:39 »

Bruce
That would have been nearly a mind altering trip for me. The Guzmania species are one of my favorites. They can be a pain to keep in good shape here in the southern U.S. but I've never shied away from a challenge. Also enjoyed your exploits in the Journal.
Best
Bob
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Brod
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Aechmea lilacinantha


« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2012, 14:31:29 »

I must get one of those kressii. Thanks for the great photos Bruce. I think I would be excited holding one of those too.

Cheers
Brod
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Scottinsandiego
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2012, 22:13:33 »

Very cool photos.  I would love to take a trip into the Choco in Columbia.  Am I right in thinking that this is the northern reaches of the same Choco biosphere in Ecuador?  In September, we saw lots of Guzmania squarrosa in the Santa Lucia preserve east-northeast of Quito, which is a cool, garish plant that looks similar to the G. Kressii that you show.  I enjoyed the BSI Journal article too!
- Scott
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Bruce
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« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2012, 23:58:19 »

Bob as I think I mentioned in that article we'd get somewhere each night and load the days images onto my laptop and just sit down with a beer and stare at what we'd seen. As you see a lot of what is there hasn't been seen for decades or is new. As Colombia becomes safer the plants we can expect to see will be amazing. We were travelling on very old developed roads not out in new areas by any means.

Scott it is a continuation of the Choco although there is a huge range between the Ecuador border and where we were. On this trip we basically only did a couple of roads with elevation changes in two areas of the Cordillera Occidental in El Valle and just in the very south of Choco state. Just think there are three cordilleras in Colombia rather than just the one in Ecuador and south.
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pedro
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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2012, 11:51:29 »

Can't wait to see the full slide show, Bruce! (2nd try) More to explore this year too! Cheers, Pedro
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Kentia_Grove (Craig)
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« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2012, 20:51:43 »

Thanks for posting the photo's Bruce. Must have been an amazing experience seeing those plants close up in their habitat. The diversity in the Guzmania's is amazing and fascinating. That kressii is a stand out.

Craig.
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