Bromeliad Forum
December 14, 2017, 10:50:43 *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

News: Any Admin problems, email me at admin@cliviaforum.co.za
 
   Home   Help Forum Rules Login Register  
Del.icio.us Digg FURL FaceBook Stumble Upon Reddit SlashDot

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Dreaming of Florida Part 2  (Read 1516 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
BobS
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
United States United States

Other Plants I Grow: TROPICALS
Posts: 98


« on: January 22, 2012, 12:47:17 »

More plants from my trip to Florida. These are also taken at Tropiflora.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

A few more pictures of Ray Colemen Neos.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

Orthophytum roseum

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

This is just to show a small part of the different plants grown there.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

Dyckohnia July. You would not want to fall on this plant. very prickly.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

This is a beautiful white orthophytum disjunctum from Minas Garais.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

Sorry Don't know the name of this Dyckia. Nice color

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

Another Tillandsia house.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

A really dwarf Bromelia gurkeniana V. funchiana.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

Never considered myself a tree hugger but I could give this a big Bear Hug. Dorstinia gigas

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

A newly described Bigeneric. X Enchotia Ruby. Recently given a write up in the Journal of the Bromeliad Society.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

T. latifolias with a bench of fasciculatas in the background.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

A big and beautiful Neo. Never got it's name.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

This is what I call the big house. It will take you a while to go through this one.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

Another shot of the big house.

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login

You don't have to rely on Neos. for color if you have one of these things around. Aechmea tayoensis. These were eye poppers.
Thats it for Tropiflora. Hope you all have enjoyed this.  I want to thank Dennis and Linda for a great time there. Their hospitality is unbeatable.
Logged

You can't make a weak man strong by making a strong man weak. Abraham Lincoln
Kentia_Grove (Craig)
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
South Africa South Africa

Other Plants I Grow: clivia, cycads, succulents, aloes
Posts: 146



« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2012, 15:14:28 »

Very impressive setup. I would have to take some calming tablets before going there. My head is spinning just from looking at the photo's. I can understand why you need a break between visits Bob. Too much to choose from.

I like that big beautiful Neo with no name. Looks like it has some baby skotak in it. Those Aechmea tayoensis have been grown very hard. Didn't know that they could handle that much light.

Craig.
Logged
Premium Advert
Lisa
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
United States United States

Other Plants I Grow: gingers, Heliconia
Posts: 1077



« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2012, 19:55:13 »

Great photos, Bob!  Nice to see at least a few Neos made the cut, even if their IDs didn't.  You can always tell where a person's interest lies by what they consider worth recording.  Wink 

And Dorstenia gigas!!!    Shocked

I'm questioning the ID of the Ortho in pic #6.  It doesn't match the O. roseum photo on FCBS.  Hard to tell without seeing it in the flesh, but to me it looks an awful lot like that Ortho that was being sold under the (incorrect) name of O. albopictum a few years back.  Harry L. confirmed that it was actually a form of O. burlemarxii.  See these old GW posts:

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/bromeliad/msg0320463728721.html

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/bromeliad/msg0519513332142.html   
Logged

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login
No ads for the duration of the month!!!

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

BobS
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
United States United States

Other Plants I Grow: TROPICALS
Posts: 98


« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2012, 22:20:32 »

Craig I did quite a few double takes as I walked through the place. Overwhelming to say the least. I can look at my pics and see things I wish I would have noticed.
The tayoensis was in a house with lots of cryptanthus and Dennis said they were starved. He mentioned he had seen one in Ecuador that was at least 10 ft across growing in shade.
Lisa I guess I did give away what catches my eye. The Tillandsias and terrestrials are getting my attention lately.
About the Orthophytum I did talk to Dennis an he assured me it was the true roseum. I did look at the pic on FCBS and it looks to be a habitat photo of a plant grown in shade. The plant at Tropiflora is in very bright light light and has very glossy leaves devoid of any scurf except on the undersides the leaves. Usually in my experience the brighter the light you give the orthophytums the more scurf you get on the upper serface of the leaves. Ill have to talk to Dennis again about it. Whatever it is it's a keeper.
Logged

You can't make a weak man strong by making a strong man weak. Abraham Lincoln
Lisa
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
United States United States

Other Plants I Grow: gingers, Heliconia
Posts: 1077



« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2012, 00:25:39 »


About the Orthophytum I did talk to Dennis an he assured me it was the true roseum. I did look at the pic on FCBS and it looks to be a habitat photo of a plant grown in shade. The plant at Tropiflora is in very bright light light and has very glossy leaves devoid of any scurf except on the undersides the leaves. Usually in my experience the brighter the light you give the orthophytums the more scurf you get on the upper serface of the leaves. Ill have to talk to Dennis again about it. Whatever it is it's a keeper.


Okay, thanks Bob.  If it's glossy then it's not the same as what I have.  Good to know somebody has O. roseum.  I love all of the flat or "sunburst" Orthos. 
Logged

You are not allowed to view images.
Please register or login
pedro
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Posts: 580



WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2012, 00:50:02 »

Hi Bob, all

Thanks again for the visual feast!

I thought I could give viewers an appreciation of the size of the Tropiflora setup too. The 3 pics are from the road in, 2 on the right covering maybe 50% (including the Till houses) and the long house on the left, also showing about 50% - there are a hell of a lot of plants to look at! The greenhouses don't just have broms either, though there are plenty to look at and too much for 1 visit. I don't remember the name of the huge Bromelia though, but it was spectacular.

Take plenty of water!

Cheers, Pedro


You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login

You are not allowed to view images.
Please
register or login
Logged
BobS
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
United States United States

Other Plants I Grow: TROPICALS
Posts: 98


« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2012, 00:59:27 »

Pedro  Yea it's an eye full and then some. My third time there and still missed lots. Dennis has some great people taking care of the different types of plants.

Best
Bob
Logged

You can't make a weak man strong by making a strong man weak. Abraham Lincoln
Kerry T.
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Australia Australia

Other Plants I Grow: You mean there are other plants besides bromeliads?
Posts: 197


« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2012, 08:22:45 »

Great travelogue Bob! Thanks for bringing back memories of my own visit there in summer of 2010, and thanks to Pedro as well. A massive complex it surely is - containing such a diversity of plants.

Pedro - I believe that spectacular Bromelia is the true balansae. Much much bigger than the furphy balansae grown in Oz.
Logged
Tropiflora
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

United States United States

Other Plants I Grow: succulents, caudiciforms, ant plants, ferns, aroids, rare epiphytes
Hobbies: adventure travel
Posts: 2


« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2012, 21:59:19 »

A little note on the Ortho. roseum. We collected that plant and had it under the tentative name of O. sanguineum for a few years. It was later described and our plants, from the type locality, were confirmed by Harry Luther. We did not make the i.d. When not blooming, our plants all have silver crossbands.
Dennis
Logged
splinter1804
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Australia Australia

Hobbies: I belong to the Illawarra Bromeliad Society as well as the Illawarra Light Railway Museum Society and we restore and operate old 2' gauge steam and diesel locomotives and associated rolling stock
Posts: 1384



« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2012, 00:25:00 »

High everyone,

Bob - Thanks for the feast of all the different genera, I'm sure there must be something there to suit all tastes.

Pedro - Thanks also for your contribution and showing us another side to the nursery. What intrigues me with all these pic's from nurseries in Australia and other countries is the many different construction methods used for their benches.  I'm especially interested in the benches shown in Bob's pic's 17 & 18. Please correct me if I'm wrong but the benches in Pic 17 seems to have the mesh just supported by metal rods?  Pic 18 (with the angled posts similar to how they do grape trellises in vineyards) seem to be anchor points for what looks like could be metal cables running the length of the benches? Have you any more info about them Bob?

Actually rather than hijack this thread, I think I'll start another thread about different types of bench construction and see what turns up from all of the different growers on the forum.

All the best, Nev.
Logged
BobS
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
United States United States

Other Plants I Grow: TROPICALS
Posts: 98


« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2012, 12:59:21 »

Nev your right about the cables supporting the wire benches. The opening in the wire is just the right size so the pot will slid in and rest on the the pot rim. You don't have to worry about wind blowing the pot over or tipping over from a top heavy plant.

Best
Bob
Logged

You can't make a weak man strong by making a strong man weak. Abraham Lincoln
No ads for the duration of the month!!!

Please consider a small donation to help cover expenses.
Local donations, click here
Donate to the Forum

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP © Copyright Bromeliad & Airplant Forum | Hosted By GTS Designs
Powered by SMF 1.1.10 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC | Sitemap
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!