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Author Topic: Neoregelia species show and tell!  (Read 5953 times)
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Devo
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« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2012, 00:25:29 »

Here's a pic of my Neo. dungsiana. Mine would have come from the same source as Graeme's, & it has the same leaf tip die back issues  Grin   But no hint of zonation  Undecided
I've had this for a couple of years, & it's been growing outside year round. Didn't see the original plant flower.


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And a couple of species that I like...

Neo Marble Throat, hard to beat that pattern, & it can work well in hybridising...always a bonus  Wink

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This is an ampullacea species collected by Elton Leme...very cool little plant.

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Cheers, Andrew.
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Lisa
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« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2012, 00:41:41 »

Andrew, that first one totally looks like the (Bob Monteith) plant that I had.  I'm sure it must be the same.  If it's in NZ, I wonder if it's in Oz too?  And if it's not dungsiana, then what is it?  The plot thickens.....   
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graykiwi
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« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2012, 09:30:46 »

Yes, gotta love a thick plot!....

Andrew is correct, our dungsiana's are from the same source in NZ and I would suspect these have come ex Brazil originally - possibly from Mr. Leme or others, but will try to find out the history on it and report...

Lisa, I agree your Bob M. original plant looks the same as ours. The one we have is also spineless, mine hasn't flowered yet so don't know re the bloom either...these species don't seem to like flowering in luke-warm kiwiland for some reason !  Huh

To me your other mini one you got from Betty and had Harry look at, is certainly not rubrifolia as I know it ?  I don't have it, but have seen one recently at our meeting and it is a zonated plant with quite shiny leaves, not unlike a small 'rafa' type or the unidentified new one Andrew showed above. Rubrifolia is exactly as per Uncle D's pic on FCBS. http://fcbs.org/images/Neo/neo_rubtifolia001.jpg. The desciption made in 1952 of it also mentions spotted leaves.

Japie, your dungsiana is obviously not the same as ours, not sure what that zonated green form is to be honest ?  Huh There is no mention of banding on Pereira's 1972 description and I'm a tad confused re it, as Uncle D's article on the subject shows the plant they have in Aussie under the "Bennet 81549" name (that he thinks could be dungsiana and is close desription-wise)....but to me it looks MUCH more like ours and Lisa's forms, than the green banded one shown on FCBS by Tropiflora and others ?? (obviously the clone you have too). He makes no reference to the green banded forms shown on FCBS - and surely the features of these types would be even further off the description mark if what he says is correct ?...so hence it's all a bit confusing really ?  Huh http://fcbs.org/butcher/N_dungsiana.htm

Re my capixaba pics, those are all only small 9cm square pots with standard bark/pumice based potting mix and the have not been fed at all, as I wanted to see how they perform in our climate being neglected. The reason it is more yellow, is it's under my 30-40% white shadecloth, so the yellows and reds really colour up all year round over here. Yours have an awesome looking form and abit larger than mine....so yeah, chuck 'em in some strong light over summer and yellow them up !

Cheers, Graeme
« Last Edit: January 11, 2012, 09:38:18 by graykiwi » Logged
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Bromaholic
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« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2012, 09:49:20 »

My fav Neo species; Neo. rubrovittata. I am not a hyhridizer, rather a consumer of your work and plant beauty. Ha! Anyway love this one.

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graykiwi
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« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2012, 11:07:06 »

Nice Bromaholic!!...one of my fave species too...Do you give these full sun and feed them at all ?
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« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2012, 11:42:31 »

Hi Graeme, no, no food and up very high under 70%.
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pedro
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« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2012, 03:02:14 »

Hi all

The Neo species (at least what's left of them in nature since 98% of their eastern Brazilian habitat has been wiped off the face of the planet) are where all of the wonderful Neos we love, began. Fortunately there are still a lot of species in some collections though be wary of anything grown from seed as they hybridise easily, even in nature. Very few self (like kautskyi) so pupping is the only guaranteed method. Some botanic gardens also have good species collections with provenance and a few are still dribbling out of Brazil courtesy of brave souls (Try getting a permit to take species out of Brazil!). Most plants raised from Brazilian seed are hybrids too, mainly because the plants were grown in nurseries or gardens.

OK, my favs are the giants but I like them all really and often work with little and big, like bahiana or Tunisia with Great White or the other 'Sharks'. Unfortunately I rarely photograph my Neo species except for the giants, unlike the Tillandsias, etc that I spend hours with almost daily! So here are a few, some maybe posted before others not.

Cheers, Pedro

Neo silvomontana
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Neo Great White (aff. gigas)
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Neo bahiana - 2 clones, one with pointy young leaves and petals the other blunt for both.
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Neo rubrovittata flowers - for Shane - added attraction. I crossed it with bahiana (and others), see what results.
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Neo pernambucana - photo is at Selby mine is yet to bloom.
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Neo rothinessa - this plant has dark blue flowers and has only recently been described. We thought they could be pernambucana at first until some plants bloomed. The whole plant goes red and is softer to feel than the likes of Great White.
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Neo Rainbow Carcharodon (as it's now registered). Photo taken at Bruce's and the red is damned near that red.
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Also taken at Bruce's - De Rolf always blows me away when it flowers and the extra food intensifies the colour.
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Neo carch Spines - the best spines of the lot!
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« Reply #22 on: January 12, 2012, 03:43:32 »

Hey Pedro,

Now that is a veritable feeding frenzy  Shocked    Hmmmm, I'd thought I'd almost caught up, but now I guess I have to add rothinessa to my list.  Ah well, there goes the bank balance again!

Shane, love that rubrovittata of yours.  Graeme, to add to Shane's comments re light, my single rubrovittata was looking much like Shane's up until a month or so ago after being in full sun from early morning to midday through winter and spring, but then the colours washed out moving into summer - not burned, but very little contrast and looking a bit parched.  I moved it into a bit more shade a couple of weeks ago and already the new growth is back to good colour and pattern.  So, if you have it out in the garden - and what a great plant it is for that - you should be able to get away with just a bit of shading from intense summer sun and hopefully stilll keep it looking terrific.

Cheers, Paul
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« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2012, 04:30:04 »

Hi Paul

Yep, sorry but still more to go! Pernambucana will take a few yrs though unless I can get my hands on some seed, or someone else does for that matter. I agree about rubrovittata - just a little protection in mid summer is all it needs. I have a big clump in the lower branches of a tibouchina  and it's all green now that the tree is mature but the pups colour up if move them into the light.

Andreas, there are lots of Neo collections in Germany that I saw, esp the smaller species, as well as in some bot g's, some very unusual/beautiful species too If you are in the DBG you would easily meet these folk at a meeting. On the other hand you might already know all of this!

Cheers, Pedro
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« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2012, 05:10:29 »

Great to see all these sp. pic's.

Pedro, you've got some beauties there! Neo bahiana looks like it could have great potential for hybridising. Did you see the recent photos from Oscar Ribeiro? They were just posted on the "Whats New" on the FCBS site. Some fantastic habitat shots of Neo bahiana...it must be a real tough customer to grow in that situation.

Heres the link:-
 
http://fcbs.org/articles/Sao_Goncalo.htm

Cheers, Andrew.
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graykiwi
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« Reply #25 on: January 12, 2012, 07:46:08 »

Yeah, great stuff Pedro...can look at them sharks and percambu types all day !
The red in that Rainbow of Bruce's is just simply ridiculous...I now have a new desktop picture !...So thanks !...

Love the bahiana's too - and yes what great habitat shots Oscar recently posted. Looks like they show the "pink lips" clone that I think you and Lisa have, Pedro ?...Unfortunately I don't have a bahiana yet, on my wishlist one day

Cheers too all for the info on rubrovittata..mine is still very young and thin, will gradually get it into higher light under the 30% white cloth.

Cheers, Graeme
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« Reply #26 on: January 12, 2012, 08:07:15 »

Hi all, very interesting and educational post, all shown are very impressive and tempting to source, That Neo carcharodon rainbow has fantastic colour Pedro also that Neo. rubrovittata bromoholic, what a stunner!!. Up first is not our favourite but one im keen to test out hybridising with at some point if we can ever get it to flower, anyone used this one before if would be interested to see some results ?? Neo leucophoea, this example has been in low light and should be quite yellow in high light but has some interesting banding patterns.
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Next is one of our favorites and a little surprised Lisa hasnt already posted this, Neo smithii

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Lisa
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« Reply #27 on: January 13, 2012, 01:45:49 »

N. leucophaea looks interesting, Jaga.  I've seen it in Leme's book but not in the trade.  Where did you get yours? 

I thought maybe everybody had seen my smithii already, but if not, here it is:

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I actually have 3 forms, but this is the one I use for hybridizing.  It's more or less spineless, as is its close relative N. coimbrae:

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A couple of other spineless species are N. simulans:

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and N. gavionensis:

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That's N. laevis 'Rafael' hiding behind it, which is pretty close to spineless too.  Other than smithii, I haven't seen anyone using these species in hybridizing.  I've been tinkering with all of them except gavionensis, which is very slow growing and does not want to bloom for me.  I'll bet it would make some nice hybrids, though. 

Then there's this thing, also spineless: 

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I don't know what its true identity is.  I believe somebody was selling it as N. pontualii, but apparently that's not correct.  Michael has it on his list as "species 'Nova Friburgo' spineless (Gurken collected)", which is an awful lot to write on a tag.  However, it appears to be the same plant that Tropiflora has registered as Spotted Frog, which is a lot easier to write (not to mention remember), so guess which name I'm using?  Wink 
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Kerry T.
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« Reply #28 on: January 14, 2012, 00:50:45 »

Terrific subject for a thread, Andreas!

Great photos and discussion all. It is good to see so many species in folks' collections. If it weren't for these great species, we'd have no man-made hybrids. But for me they are worthy of cultivation as they are too - not just for their hybridising potential.

My personal fave is N.'Skotak's Tiger', even if I can't grow it in my clime as well as others. Can't wait to own and grow those recently-described ones in the N.pernambucana complex.

I'm very fond of the brilliant red of N.camorimiana, especially when grown epiphytically or up high in a hanging basket. Lisa - your N.gavionensis is beautifully grown. I'm also in love with the Hylaeaicum subgenus (possibly a genus of its own).

Here are two more to add to the list of worthy Neoregelia species. I've shown these ol' pics in the past... but here they are again.

Neo. kautskyi
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Neo. pascoaliana
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jaga
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« Reply #29 on: January 14, 2012, 08:14:46 »

Lisa, we are quite lucky here as a lot of neo species  have been brought in from Brazil and are now distributed amongst interested parties, we have been gradually getting a few, heres another that is very  interesting, Neo fluminensis.

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