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Author Topic: Neoregelia species show and tell!  (Read 5952 times)
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AndreasZlg
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« on: January 05, 2012, 18:08:08 »

Hey folks,

let`s have a show and tell topic in which everybody can introduce his or her favorite Neoregelia species.
I`d love to see what is out there.

I will start with one of my favorites: Neoregelia sarmentosa var. chlorosticta

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Its a "fireball" sized species which handled full sun (all day) in Germany. But always gave me a hard time getting pups. Think the reason could have been that my way of growing it did not include any fertilizer at all. As soon as I am back from Colombia I will try to get a nice clump from it using some Osmocote. 

Greetings
Andreas
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Lisa
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« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2012, 03:05:13 »

I'm not sure how the "sarmentosa v. chlorosticta" thing got started, but that name has been knocking around in the trade for many years.  It has no botanical standing, however.  There is N. chlorosticta and N. sarmentosa.  Your plant looks about right for N. chlorosticta, Andreas.  I'd cross the "sarmentosa" off the label. 
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AndreasZlg
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« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2012, 03:33:44 »

Ok I will. Just took the name from the label the botanical garden I got it from used.
As far as I know they got it back in the early 90ies from A. Seidel.
Maybe it was that they called it sarmentosa var. chlorosticta back then.
Thanks, learned something today ;-)
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Kentia_Grove (Craig)
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2012, 18:23:47 »

Hi Andreas

I don't have many species Neoregelia, so i decided to post a picture of a plant that is in flower now. Neoregelia nivea is a bit different with it's white centre. The plant seems to like being grown a bit more on the shade side. I was wondering if anyone could comment on whether it may be of any use in hybridizing due to the white centre? I like your Neo chlorosticta Andreas. Nice colour and speckles for a species.

Neo nivea

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Craig.
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Lisa
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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2012, 20:23:06 »

Craig, I attempted pollinating N. nivea, but nothing I put on it took.  I think it does have some potential as a pollen parent, though. 

At first I wasn't sure about it because white isn't really a pigment, but a lack of pigment.  All Neos that color up in the cup at bloom time do so because the green pigment in the center "shuts off" during that period and allows whatever other pigments are in the plant (red or purple usually) to show through more brightly.  In a white-cupped Neo, the green also shuts off but there is no other pigment to show through, so what's left is the absence of color.  There is no logical reason to think that the whiteness would lighten up the colors from another parent if the same "shutting off" mechanism exists in both.  I say logically, but then I saw N. Key West on FCBS:
 
http://fcbs.org/cgi-bin/dbman/db.cgi?db=neophoto&uid=default&neophotono=&Genus=&Name=key+west&Remarks=&Photos=&Hybridizer=&Seed_parent=&Pollen_parent=&modifydate=&creationdate=&keyword=&mh=5&sb=---&so=ascend&view_records=View+Records

If that photo is any indication, apparently it does have an effect, although I am at a loss to explain it.  Then when I was at Michael's I saw this Skotak cross of carolinae Pink x nivea.  It's past bloom here, but the cups were clearly a pale pink:
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I later ordered one, thinking it would be the pink one, but what he sent was another clone that is lavender-blue in the cup.  I'm not complaining, it just goes to show how much variation you can get from the same two parents.  I'm not seeing the nivea influence here, but it's a nice plant:
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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2012, 23:46:48 »

Hi everyone,

Craig - It's interesting to see your plant with the leaf tips all ? burnt. I have three Neo. nivea plants, all from different sources and they all have the same problem, even when grown in different locations around the yard. (Let me add that these are the only plants so affected).

Lisa - (Or anyone else for that matter), Do you experience this type of thing with your clone/s of Neo. nivea also? Given that Craig and I live in different countries, do you think it could be the climatic conditions of our areas or a trait of our particular clones?

If not, what are we doing wrong  Huh Huh

All the best, Nev.
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Lisa
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« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2012, 00:14:18 »

I get brown tips too, Nev.  Maybe not quite so much as in Craig's photo, but it definitely seems to be one of the weaknesses of the species. 
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« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2012, 05:17:15 »

Hi everyone,

Thanks Lisa, that's good to know. It seems like it's not just me after all.

All the best, Nev.
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Kentia_Grove (Craig)
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« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2012, 17:00:51 »

Thanks for the insight Lisa. I like the light pink centre of the carolinae pink x Nivea in the pics from Michael's bromeliads. Looks like there may be some potential to produce paler coloured centres in other plants as well. I might give it a try, however I am fast learning that I have to be more selective with crossings as it takes a lot of space to raise all the seedlings.

Nev, while taking the photo of the Neo nivea, I also had to have a closer look at the brown on the tips again as I was also thinking it was some leaf tip burn. However on closer inspection I noticed that the brown is actually a natural brown colour on the tip and not a burn. If you look at the leaves in the photo the brown on the tips is uniform in shape and size on all the leaves. Have a look at the tip from the underside of the leaf as well. It looks as though the brown marking on the tip only becomes more prevalent when the plant is mature. I had a look on some medium size grown plants and the brown on the tips is noticeable, but very small at that stage.

This year my plants are not burnt which made it easier to notice that the brown tip was actually a natural marking as opposed to sun burn damage.

Closeup of emerging leaf on mature plant showing leaf tip

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There is a darker outer line, with lighter brown inner and then the dark tip with thorn.

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¾ size plant showing smaller emerging brown tips.

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Regards,
Craig.
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« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2012, 20:10:15 »

Hi everyone,

Craig - That's great to know, I'll have to have another closer look at my plants today; but unfortunately I suspect that on my plants it is as I said, as it isn't uniform on every leaf and the marking are different sizes on each leaf as well. 

All the best, Nev.
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2012, 08:00:59 »

Here's a couple you don't see every day...

Neo. capixaba
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capixaba is stoloniferous and has very stiff leaves and a nice compact bulbous form...can't wait for it to flower. Interesting there doesn't appear to be any registered hybrids using it ? Have you tried anything with it Lisa ?...or anyone else ?

Neo. dungsiana (front) and Neo. crispata (lime green stoloniferous to the right and behind)
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Lisa, I see you have supposedly played with dungsiana in making 'Doodlebug'. Going by the "?" mark after dungsiana name on the BCR, do we assume you are unsure of the origin or name of the mum you used ??...Interesting nothing is registered using crispata too. It's a nice little stoloniferous lime green mini with subtle banding/stripes underside.

Cheers, Graeme
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« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2012, 16:34:10 »

Thanks for showing all the species so far, I really love this thread.

Here`s my Capixaba in full bloom
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Side view of heavily fed plants. Motherplant on the right, first pup of her on the left. See the colour on the pup getting lighter in the center (though I manipulated the saturation on this pic a bit too much to make it more visible)


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« Last Edit: January 10, 2012, 21:04:44 by AndreasZlg » Logged
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« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2012, 20:05:09 »

Graeme, I'm very interested in the growing conditions of of your Neo's capixaba and dungsiana.  What kind of medium is it planted in and has it been fed?  And what is the size of those square pots they are planted in?

My N capixaba has not been fed for the last five years and is more the colour of Andreas' plant.  One clump is potted and one is mounted.  Both in bright light but not in direct sun.  And your dungsiana looks much fatter than mine.  And a bit larger - that's why I am curious about the size of your pots.  I did give it a very small amount of slow release fertiliser when I planted it about a year ago.  Mine also show some faint zonation on the undersides of the leaves - like Michael Andreas' side view picture on FCBS. My camera's battery just went flat otherwise  would have taken some pictures now, but will do so tomorrow. 

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Lisa
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« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2012, 22:21:48 »


Lisa, I see you have supposedly played with dungsiana in making 'Doodlebug'. Going by the "?" mark after dungsiana name on the BCR, do we assume you are unsure of the origin or name of the mum you used ??...Interesting nothing is registered using crispata too. It's a nice little stoloniferous lime green mini with subtle banding/stripes underside.


There are at least a couple of forms of N. crispata.  The one I have is bronze:

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I have done only one cross with it so far (Dulce de Leche).  You can see it on this thread:  http://www.bromeliadforum.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=458.0   
Your clone looks a bit closer to N. tigrina, Graeme.  Harry L. says he considers these to be the same species anyway, so that makes sense.  I'm can't remember if he thinks crispata is a form of tigrina or vice versa. 

I don't have capixaba, but I've been thinking about getting one.  I'd be interested to see anything anyone has done with it. 

As for dungsiana, that is another can of worms (my apologies in advance for getting long-winded).  Graeme, what color are the flowers on your plant?  Does it have smooth margins or can you feel fine spines?  And how large?  I ask because it looks a bit like something I purchased as "dungsiana" may years ago from the late Bob Monteith in SoCal:    http://fcbs.org/butcher/N_dungsiana.htm 
 
As Derek points out, this plant doesn't match the description of dungsiana, nor does it look anything like what is currently grown under that name in the trade.  For this reason he took it upon himself to give it my name, which is a bit ironic since I really had nothing to do with it, and don't even have the plant anymore (I didn't find out about it until I saw my pics on FCBS, but that's another story).  At any rate, it has smooth margins, the flowers are mostly white with a pale pink/lavender tinge, and it is much bigger and fatter than the dungsiana of the trade.  Unfortunately it developed a leaf spotting problem so I threw it out, but now I'm really wishing I'd kept it.  If memory serves, I did attempt at least one cross with it before I dumped it, but didn't get anything worth keeping.  With the right pairing, though, it may have some potential.  I think Pam Koide at Birdrock may still have some, as she inherited all of Bob's stock. 

Part II of the saga:  I got this little species from the late Betty Ho:

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As with many of her plants, it was wild collected and she didn't know the name.  At one point I sent some other material to Harry at the BIC for an ID, so I decided to throw one of these (post-bloom) into the box too, on the off-chance he knew what it was.  I told him if he could ID it, great, if he couldn't do so without a fresh flower, I'd understand.  His response was not definitive, but he tentatively allied it with N. rubrifolia.  Based on that, I tagged it "cf. rubrifolia". 

Part III:  Fast forward a few years, I order N. dungsiana from Michael's.  This is what I got:

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Looks familiar, doesn't it?  It's not identical to the Betty Ho plant, but it's pretty darn close.  Same size, habit and flower, the only slight difference is in the coloration.  This  next picture isn't very clear, but shows the difference in color better.  Michael's dungsiana on the left (more green), the BH species in the middle (darker maroon):

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The one on the right I'm not exactly sure of either.  A friend had it as a form of ampullacea, but does anyone think it might be N. rubrifolia?  It certainly looks more like the FCBS photo of rubrifolia than any ampullacea, but that's just my impression.  At any rate, I included in the pic for comparison.  I do believe the middle plant is closer to dungsiana than to rubrifolia, and that is the one I used to make Doodlebug, hence the question mark in the registry.   Hope that's not too confusing.   Roll Eyes

I've been using both the BH clone and Michael's clone a fair amount lately to make smaller hybrids.  Next to lilliputiana, it's about the smallest species I have. 
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« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2012, 23:19:01 »

OK, battery recharged and I took some night time pictures.

This is what my Neo capixaba looks like right now.  It is not as green as Andreas' plant, but also not as yellow as Graeme's.  I like that yellow appearance, so I think it is time I mount some in direct sun.

Neo capixaba

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And here is my Neo dungsiana in a 12cm pot.  It does not have smooth leaf margins, but you can feel, rather than see the spines.  It flowered a while ago and I think it had blue flowers.  I forgot to take a picture.  I think my plant came from Tropiflora.  I'll ask Lyn.

Neo dungsiana

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And while I was taking pictures, I thought I'd show you 2 of my favourite species.

Neo tarapotoensis is very difficult for me to grow and I nearly lost it.  I still got the original plant, but now half dead with a young pup attached to it.  I like those almost black patches on the leaves.  But grown in more light, it has a slightly different appearance.

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And this one I like very much.  I got it initially as Aech aculeatosepala, but it has flowers just like a Neo.  It looks very much like Neo hoehneana - especially the colour - but the whole clump does not look as 'untidy' as hoehneana and has also slightly shorter and wider leaves.  The form of the individual plants, as well as the whole clump, looks almost exactly like Neo kulmannii (which I do not have) but its leaves are not as green.

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