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Author Topic: Dangling Tills  (Read 1048 times)
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sdandy
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« on: December 16, 2011, 18:19:28 »

Since a couple of you liked the shots of my dangling Tillandsias I figured I would show a couple of more shots.  I am slowly using all available space. The only problem is if we get bad wind storms. Usually we don't get anything too crazy, but if I know it is coming I will go around and pull a bunch down and just set them on the ground.  I won't produce any show plants this way (way to much little damage that adds up), but it is a great way to grow them.

It is hard to see the details in these shots, but it is hard to capture individual detail while also showing the overall method...

The ones that can take full sun (T. albida, tectorum, ehlersiana, etc) I mount on branches that are 'potted' in concrete.  Nice way to add vertical structure for the Tills.
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There are a couple of larger branches that are 'potted' in concrete and 'planted' in the garden in slightly shadier spots.  These are great for under eave spouts and other 'tight' areas. This one is just to the right of the palm...can't see the branch as it is completely smothered in Tills.
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There is one to the far left in this shot.  But most of these are hanging from chains, wires, etc.
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Some hang under a pine (pain-in-the-ss with needles and sap)
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Any tree that give just enough shade gets plants stuck in it like these poor ficus (but also my small fig and shoestring acacia)
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But by far, most of them are hanging in my olive tree.  The tank broms underneath hate it because of the leaf and olive drop, but the Tills don't seem to catch nearly as much junk.
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As you can see, some areas aren't particularly pretty, but it sure works...
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Devo
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« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2011, 20:45:01 »

Very cool Andy. I like the effect and the use of space.

How do you attached the till's to the wire / chain to hang them?
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gonzer
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Gnarly dude!


« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2011, 21:01:47 »

Hey Andy, until you pointed out the pine tree in that pic I was thinking "Damn! That's the biggest clump of T. setacea I EVER seen!
Do you have any  x nidus? When they're hung in a southern exposure the tips stay red all year. If ya don't have any we'll set ya up.
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Kerry T.
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« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2011, 00:11:42 »

Love that effect Andy! They rival your magnificent society Christmas tree - far more natural looking.

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sdandy
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« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2011, 02:27:21 »

Yeah, that would be one special setacea clump!  Probably 50+ feet tall!  Wowza!  Shocked Shocked
You set me up with a xNidus already...but I haven't been brutal with it yet.  I guess I should get started as it is the season...

I agree Kez, clearly more my style than the Xmas tree.  I would describe that as a bit garish.  But to me the whole holiday is also, so maybe it fits!  Wink  And as you know, I am clearly a bigger fan of these plants than those decorating the Xmas tree.

Devo, short answer: depends on the plant!  A combination of fishing line, wire, plants mounted on wood/cork, and every combination of those things.  Tomorrow I'll take some closer shots of some of the plants and hanging methods.
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